ode


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ode

a lyric poem expressive of exalted or enthusiastic emotion
Not to be confused with:
owed – obliged to pay; indebted: He still owed money on his car loan.; to have a feeling toward someone or something: He owed me gratitude for my help.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

ode

 (ōd)
n.
1. A lyric poem of some length, usually of a serious or meditative nature and having an elevated style and formal stanzaic structure.
2.
a. A choric song of classical Greece, often accompanied by a dance and performed at a public festival or as part of a drama.
b. A classical Greek poem modeled on the choric ode and usually having a three-part structure consisting of a strophe, an antistrophe, and an epode.

[French, choric song, from Old French, from Late Latin ōdē, ōda, from Greek aoidē, ōidē, song; see wed- in Indo-European roots.]

od′ic (ō′dĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ode

(əʊd)
n
1. (Poetry) a lyric poem, typically addressed to a particular subject, with lines of varying lengths and complex rhythms. See also Horatian ode, Pindaric ode
2. (Poetry) (formerly) a poem meant to be sung
[C16: via French from Late Latin ōda, from Greek ōidē, from aeidein to sing]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ode

(oʊd)

n.
a lyric poem, typically with an irregular metrical form and expressing exalted or enthusiastic emotion.
[1580–90; < Middle French < Late Latin ōda < Greek aoidḗ song, derivative of aeídein to sing]
od′ic, adj.

-ode1

,
a suffix appearing in loanwords from Greek, where it meant “like,” “having the nature of”; used to form nouns: phyllode. Compare -oid.
[< Greek -ōdēs]

-ode2

,
a combining form meaning “way,” “path,” used esp. in the names of devices through which electrical current passes: electrode.
[< Greek -odos, comb. form of hodós]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ode

A lyric poem, usually in elaborate form, typically addressed to and eulogizing a particular subject.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ode - a lyric poem with complex stanza forms
lyric poem, lyric - a short poem of songlike quality
epithalamium - an ode honoring a bride and bridegroom
Horatian ode, Sapphic ode - an ode with several stanzas
Pindaric, Pindaric ode - an ode form used by Pindar; has triple groups of triple units
choral ode - ode sung by the chorus in classical Greek drama
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
قَصيدَه غِنائِيَّه
óda
ode
oodi
óda
óîur, lofsöngur
odė
oda
odă
óda
ode

ode

[əʊd] Noda f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ode

[ˈəʊd] node f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

ode

nOde f (→ to, on an +acc)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

ode

[əʊd] node f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

ode

(əud) noun
a poem written to a person or thing. `Ode to a Nightingale' was written by John Keats.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Of the Choric part the Parode is the first undivided utterance of the Chorus: the Stasimon is a Choric ode without anapaests or trochaic tetrameters: the Commos is a joint lamentation of Chorus and actors.
"You know Felicity has a birthday next week," he said, "and I want to write her an ode."
You may have met with her "Ode to an Expiring Frog," sir.'
Leo Hunter's recitation of her far-famed 'Ode to an Expiring Frog,' which was encored once, and would have been encored twice, if the major part of the guests, who thought it was high time to get something to eat, had not said that it was perfectly shameful to take advantage of Mrs.
The word really means a goat-song, and comes from two Greek words, "tragos" a goat and "ode" a song.
The Ode on a Grecian Urn is more lovely now than when it was written, because for a hundred years lovers have read it and the sick at heart taken comfort in its lines."
The "Commemoration Ode" of Lowell has also been a source from which I drank something of the divine ecstasy of the poet's own exalted mood, and I would set this level with the 'Biglow Papers,' high above all his other work, and chief of the things this age of our country shall be remembered by.
The Woggle-Bug was head professor at the Royal College of Oz, and he had composed a fine Ode in honor of Ozma's birthday.
As often as not, he carried a book in his hand, into which he would glance, then shut it up, and repeat the rest of the ode from memory.
As it was, every one was conscious that by observing certain rules, such as punctuality and quiet, by cooking well, and performing other small duties, one ode after another was satisfactorily restored to the world, and they shared the continuity of the scholar's life.
All things in these Odes collected by Confucius belong to the surface of life; they are the work of those who easily plough light furrows, knowing nothing of hidden gold.
But the odes of Keats and of Wordsworth, a poem or two by Coleridge, a few more by Shelley, discovered vast realms of the spirit that none had explored before.