odeion


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Related to odeion: Oden

odeion

A small classical building for musical contests.
References in periodicals archive ?
KOAPENG, HAYDN, SHOSTAKOVICH: Odeion String Quartet 12.
The Romans added the Odeion of Herodes Atticus around AD 160.
ClickPress, Wed Jul 06 2011] Night of the Full Moon will see major landmarks such as Odeion of Herodes Atticus and the Acropolis opening for free to allow people to explore the ancient architecture under the moonlight.
The Odeion of Herodes Atticus, also situated by the Acropolis, was used for an amateur production as early as 1867; yet, there are indications that this space was largely treated as a closed theater: an added platform with a drop-curtain was placed in the middle of the stage, while the orchestra was used to seat the officials.
For example, in their region of Oriens, there were towns with theaters such as in Bostra (Busra) and in the cities of the Decapolis, including Gerasa (Jarash); but as good Monophysites, the Ghassanids viewed the mime and the theater as un-Christian but embraced the odeion as a venue for poetry recitals, oratory, and music (p.
About 400 pupils, seated in the well appointed Odeion, listened to lectures with slides and took part in a quiz.
For example, in a paroxysm of grief Herodes built grand monuments in Regilla's memory, including the famous Odeion below the Acropolis.
Another fascinating finding was an odeion - a small, roofed theater-like structure, the first of its kind to be exposed in Israel.
Get an early start because there's lots to see - mosaics in the Houses of Dionysos, Theseus and Aion; vaults and caves of the Tombs of the Kings; the ancient Odeion Theatre; a creepy little underground church in the Catacombs and the fort guarding the harbour.
1) a Latin inscription recording the restoration of the Odeion names Imp.
Other sites in Athens are the Arch of Hadrian, the Monument of Lysirkates, the Olympic Stadium, the Theater of Dionysos, the Odeion of Herodes Atticus, and the Theseion, a focal point of ancient Athenian community life.
Much more thrilling is the link suggested between that very strange building Pericles' Odeion, apparently a rectilinear structure with a pyramidal roof and, possibly, no walls, and the Persian hypostyle audience hall, both being expressions of imperial power.