odontology

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o·don·tol·o·gy

 (ō′dŏn-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of the structure, development, and abnormalities of the teeth.

o·don′to·log′i·cal (-tə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
o·don′to·log′i·cal·ly adv.
o′don·tol′o·gist n.

odontology

(ˌɒdɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Dentistry) the branch of science concerned with the anatomy, development, and diseases of teeth and related structures
odontological, odontologic adj
ˌodonˈtologist n

odontology

1. the science that studies teeth and their surrounding tissues, especially the prevention and cure of their diseases.
2. dentistry. Also called dentology. — odontologist, n.odontological, adj.
See also: Teeth

odontology

The study of teeth and diseases of teeth.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.odontology - the branch of medicine dealing with the anatomy and development and diseases of the teethodontology - the branch of medicine dealing with the anatomy and development and diseases of the teeth
crownwork, jacket crown, jacket, cap, crown - (dentistry) dental appliance consisting of an artificial crown for a broken or decayed tooth; "tomorrow my dentist will fit me for a crown"
dental appliance - a device to repair teeth or replace missing teeth
filling - (dentistry) a dental appliance consisting of any of various substances (as metal or plastic) inserted into a prepared cavity in a tooth; "when he yawned I could see the gold fillings in his teeth"; "an informal British term for `filling' is `stopping'"
impression - (dentistry) an imprint of the teeth and gums in wax or plaster; "the dentist took an impression for use in preparing an inlay"
inlay - (dentistry) a filling consisting of a solid substance (as gold or porcelain) fitted to a cavity in a tooth and cemented into place
occlusion - (dentistry) the normal spatial relation of the teeth when the jaws are closed
bonding - (dentistry) a technique for repairing a tooth; resinous material is applied to the surface of the tooth where it adheres to the tooth's enamel
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
cosmetic dentistry - the branch of dentistry dealing with the appearance of the teeth
dental surgery - the branch of dentistry involving surgical procedures
endodontia, endodontics - the branch of dentistry dealing with diseases of the dental pulp
dental orthopaedics, dental orthopedics, orthodontia, orthodontics, orthodonture - the branch of dentistry dealing with the prevention or correction of irregularities of the teeth
periodontia, periodontics - the branch of dentistry dealing with diseases of the gums and other structures around the teeth
prosthodontia, prosthodontics - the branch of dentistry dealing with the replacement of teeth and related mouth or jaw structures by artificial devices
malocclusion - (dentistry) a condition in which the opposing teeth do not mesh normally
overbite - (dentistry) malocclusion in which the upper teeth extend abnormally far over the lower teeth
crowned - having an (artificial) crown on a tooth; "had many crowned teeth"
uncrowned - not having an (artificial) crown on a tooth; used especially of molars and bicuspids; "uncrowned teeth badly in need of attention"
Translations

odontology

[ˌɒdɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ] Nodontología f

odontology

nOdontologie f, → Zahnheilkunde f

o·don·tol·o·gy

n. odontología, estudio de los dientes y del tratamiento de las enfermedades dentales.
References in periodicals archive ?
Transactions of the Odontological Society of Great Britain, 5, 323-392.
All the agents who remain have taken a position regarding GOH as a break with prevailing odontological practice, and their main field is scientific (Tabela 2).
Staphylococcus aureus ampicillin-resistant from the odontological clinic environment.
The influence of disinfectant agents on the dimensional stability of elastomeric impression materials and surface durability of odontological Gypsum.
While in Brazil the first in questioning the model of individual odontological care were the students organized in the National Union of Odontology Students (UNEO, for the term in Portuguese); (10) in Colombia, the origin and insertion of the departments of preventive and social Odontology in the faculties of Odontology is discussed and hindered.
Medicinal plants have been used in disease therapy for many years and the search for products of vegetal origin that could substitute conventional medicines in a more cost-effective and aggressive manner has caught the interest of odontological researchers due to the high therapeutic potential of some vegetable molecules (ALVARES & JUNIOR, 2009).
Louis Post-Dispatch declared that "The only collection of books devoted exclusively to dentistry which approaches [McKellops's] in completeness is that of the Odontological Society in London.
Freer, 2004), odontological studies with similar goals have been successfully undertaken in modern cases when investigators need to identify the species, or even the individual animal, involved in human-animal and animal-animal encounters (e.
Restriction fragment length polymorphisms of mutans streptococci in forensic odontological analysis.
Past dental records are often available, dental characteristics are unique to each individual (even genetic identical twins have different odontological profiles).
Owing to all these characteristics, xylitol is a feedstock of particular interest to the food odontological and pharmaceutical industries.