odontology

(redirected from odontologists)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to odontologists: forensic dentistry

o·don·tol·o·gy

 (ō′dŏn-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of the structure, development, and abnormalities of the teeth.

o·don′to·log′i·cal (-tə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
o·don′to·log′i·cal·ly adv.
o′don·tol′o·gist n.

odontology

(ˌɒdɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Dentistry) the branch of science concerned with the anatomy, development, and diseases of teeth and related structures
odontological, odontologic adj
ˌodonˈtologist n

odontology

1. the science that studies teeth and their surrounding tissues, especially the prevention and cure of their diseases.
2. dentistry. Also called dentology. — odontologist, n.odontological, adj.
See also: Teeth

odontology

The study of teeth and diseases of teeth.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.odontology - the branch of medicine dealing with the anatomy and development and diseases of the teethodontology - the branch of medicine dealing with the anatomy and development and diseases of the teeth
crownwork, jacket crown, jacket, cap, crown - (dentistry) dental appliance consisting of an artificial crown for a broken or decayed tooth; "tomorrow my dentist will fit me for a crown"
dental appliance - a device to repair teeth or replace missing teeth
filling - (dentistry) a dental appliance consisting of any of various substances (as metal or plastic) inserted into a prepared cavity in a tooth; "when he yawned I could see the gold fillings in his teeth"; "an informal British term for `filling' is `stopping'"
impression - (dentistry) an imprint of the teeth and gums in wax or plaster; "the dentist took an impression for use in preparing an inlay"
inlay - (dentistry) a filling consisting of a solid substance (as gold or porcelain) fitted to a cavity in a tooth and cemented into place
occlusion - (dentistry) the normal spatial relation of the teeth when the jaws are closed
bonding - (dentistry) a technique for repairing a tooth; resinous material is applied to the surface of the tooth where it adheres to the tooth's enamel
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
cosmetic dentistry - the branch of dentistry dealing with the appearance of the teeth
dental surgery - the branch of dentistry involving surgical procedures
endodontia, endodontics - the branch of dentistry dealing with diseases of the dental pulp
dental orthopaedics, dental orthopedics, orthodontia, orthodontics, orthodonture - the branch of dentistry dealing with the prevention or correction of irregularities of the teeth
periodontia, periodontics - the branch of dentistry dealing with diseases of the gums and other structures around the teeth
prosthodontia, prosthodontics - the branch of dentistry dealing with the replacement of teeth and related mouth or jaw structures by artificial devices
malocclusion - (dentistry) a condition in which the opposing teeth do not mesh normally
overbite - (dentistry) malocclusion in which the upper teeth extend abnormally far over the lower teeth
crowned - having an (artificial) crown on a tooth; "had many crowned teeth"
uncrowned - not having an (artificial) crown on a tooth; used especially of molars and bicuspids; "uncrowned teeth badly in need of attention"
Translations

odontology

[ˌɒdɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ] Nodontología f

odontology

nOdontologie f, → Zahnheilkunde f

o·don·tol·o·gy

n. odontología, estudio de los dientes y del tratamiento de las enfermedades dentales.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the plane crashed with such force that specialists - including forensic archaeologists, anthropologists, odontologists and pathologists - are having to examine the DNA, teeth and human remains to discover who was killed in the disaster amid fears that the toll may yet rise.
The team comprises the Deputy Director of VIFM, Associate Professor David Ranson, who is a forensic pathologist, together with two odontologists, who specialise in identifying victims from dental records, and a mortuary technician.
examination method used by the State's odontologists had since been
Chapters are contributed by forensic odontologists from the US.
The effect of natural wear, environmental factors exposure, dental treatments and dental diseases will lead to dentition changes in each individual (7) In a 2003 survey of forensic odontologists, 91 percent of respondents found the human dentition unique and 78 percent believed that the unique dentition would replicate on human skin--findings echoed by diplomats of the American Board of Forensic Odontology (ABFO).
several years before West began to encounter difficulties with the [American Academy of Forensic Sciences, the American Board of Forensic Odontologists, and the International Association of Identification] and, thus, this evidence, which casts serious doubts as to West's credibility, was not before the jury.
A BIOK survey, conducted to better understand Lithuanians' preferences for toothpaste, showed that "the ideal toothpaste" for compatriots is one approved by odontologists, ecologic, natural and locally made.
NOMAD has proven itself as a valuable tool for forensic odontologists in past disasters such as the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami, Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and last year's earthquake in Haiti.
See the results of proficiency tests taken by members of the American Board of Forensic Odontologists set out in Michael Bowers, Identification from Bitemarks: Scientific Issues, 4 MOD.
Silver and Souviron (chief forensic odontologists, Miami Dade Medical Examiner's office) include over 300 color images to covers all types of procedures such as crime scene intake, exhumation and dealing with fresh, decomposed and skeletal remains.