odontology

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Related to odontologists: forensic dentistry

o·don·tol·o·gy

 (ō′dŏn-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of the structure, development, and abnormalities of the teeth.

o·don′to·log′i·cal (-tə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
o·don′to·log′i·cal·ly adv.
o′don·tol′o·gist n.

odontology

(ˌɒdɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Dentistry) the branch of science concerned with the anatomy, development, and diseases of teeth and related structures
odontological, odontologic adj
ˌodonˈtologist n

odontology

1. the science that studies teeth and their surrounding tissues, especially the prevention and cure of their diseases.
2. dentistry. Also called dentology. — odontologist, n.odontological, adj.
See also: Teeth

odontology

The study of teeth and diseases of teeth.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.odontology - the branch of medicine dealing with the anatomy and development and diseases of the teethodontology - the branch of medicine dealing with the anatomy and development and diseases of the teeth
crownwork, jacket crown, jacket, cap, crown - (dentistry) dental appliance consisting of an artificial crown for a broken or decayed tooth; "tomorrow my dentist will fit me for a crown"
dental appliance - a device to repair teeth or replace missing teeth
filling - (dentistry) a dental appliance consisting of any of various substances (as metal or plastic) inserted into a prepared cavity in a tooth; "when he yawned I could see the gold fillings in his teeth"; "an informal British term for `filling' is `stopping'"
impression - (dentistry) an imprint of the teeth and gums in wax or plaster; "the dentist took an impression for use in preparing an inlay"
inlay - (dentistry) a filling consisting of a solid substance (as gold or porcelain) fitted to a cavity in a tooth and cemented into place
occlusion - (dentistry) the normal spatial relation of the teeth when the jaws are closed
bonding - (dentistry) a technique for repairing a tooth; resinous material is applied to the surface of the tooth where it adheres to the tooth's enamel
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
cosmetic dentistry - the branch of dentistry dealing with the appearance of the teeth
dental surgery - the branch of dentistry involving surgical procedures
endodontia, endodontics - the branch of dentistry dealing with diseases of the dental pulp
dental orthopaedics, dental orthopedics, orthodontia, orthodontics, orthodonture - the branch of dentistry dealing with the prevention or correction of irregularities of the teeth
periodontia, periodontics - the branch of dentistry dealing with diseases of the gums and other structures around the teeth
prosthodontia, prosthodontics - the branch of dentistry dealing with the replacement of teeth and related mouth or jaw structures by artificial devices
malocclusion - (dentistry) a condition in which the opposing teeth do not mesh normally
overbite - (dentistry) malocclusion in which the upper teeth extend abnormally far over the lower teeth
crowned - having an (artificial) crown on a tooth; "had many crowned teeth"
uncrowned - not having an (artificial) crown on a tooth; used especially of molars and bicuspids; "uncrowned teeth badly in need of attention"
Translations

odontology

[ˌɒdɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ] Nodontología f

odontology

nOdontologie f, → Zahnheilkunde f

o·don·tol·o·gy

n. odontología, estudio de los dientes y del tratamiento de las enfermedades dentales.
References in periodicals archive ?
He worked as a consultant for the Cook County Medical Examiner and was a member of the team of odontologists who worked to identify victims of serial killer John Wayne Gacy and casualties of the crash of American Airline Flight 191 in 1979.
11) The interpretation and organization of official AM records is considered one of the most time-consuming and difficult tasks facing forensic odontologists due to the variations of each dental professional's own subjective style.
Tenders are invited for provide consultative services of forensic odontologists in identifying persons who cannot be visually identified.
The decisions made by odontologists have been traditionally based on past experiences of previous treatment cases.
18) Hospitals today no longer have just physicians, nurses, and social workers; they now incorporate odontologists, administrators, biochemists, psychologists, lawyers, sociologists, communicators, accountants, information technologists, biologists, nutritionists, pharmacologists, bioengineers, translators, architects, chemists, kinesiology professionals, and teachers, among others, each profession with its own logic and technical language.
But the plane crashed with such force that specialists - including forensic archaeologists, anthropologists, odontologists and pathologists - are having to examine the DNA, teeth and human remains to discover who was killed in the disaster amid fears that the toll may yet rise.
But currently there is no agreement among forensic Odontologists about the individuality (uniqueness) of the dentition and on the behavior of human skin during and after biting.
examination method used by the State's odontologists had since been
In 1996, some of us developed the American Board of Forensic Entomology; a certification Board for Forensic Entomologists, similar to the Board certification available for forensic odontologists and forensic anthropologists.
Chapters are contributed by forensic odontologists from the US.
Once these records have been compiled, forensic odontologists can be begin comparisons between remains and ante mortem records.
The effect of natural wear, environmental factors exposure, dental treatments and dental diseases will lead to dentition changes in each individual (7) In a 2003 survey of forensic odontologists, 91 percent of respondents found the human dentition unique and 78 percent believed that the unique dentition would replicate on human skin--findings echoed by diplomats of the American Board of Forensic Odontology (ABFO).