offended


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Related to offended: easily offended

of·fend

 (ə-fĕnd′)
v. of·fend·ed, of·fend·ing, of·fends
v.tr.
1. To cause displeasure, anger, resentment, or wounded feelings in: We were offended by his tasteless jokes.
2. To be displeasing or disagreeable to: Onions offend my sense of smell.
v.intr.
1. To result in displeasure: Bad manners may offend.
2.
a. To violate a moral or divine law; sin.
b. To violate a rule or law: offended against the curfew.

[Middle English offenden, from Old French offendre, from Latin offendere; see gwhen- in Indo-European roots.]

of·fend′er n.
Synonyms: offend, insult, affront, outrage
These verbs mean to cause resentment, humiliation, or hurt. To offend is to cause displeasure, wounded feelings, or repugnance in another: "He often offended men who might have been useful friends" (John Lothrop Motley).
Insult implies gross insensitivity, insolence, or contemptuous rudeness: "My father had insulted her by refusing to come to our wedding" (James Carroll).
To affront is to insult openly, usually intentionally: "He continued to belabor the poor woman in a studied effort to affront his hated chieftain" (Edgar Rice Burroughs).
Outrage implies the flagrant violation of a person's integrity, pride, or sense of right and decency: "He revered the men and women who transformed this piece of grassland into a great city, and he was outraged by the attacks on their reputation" (James S. Hirsch).

offended

(əˈfɛndɪd)
adj
upset or angry
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.offended - hurt or upset; "she looked offended"; "face had a pained and puzzled expression"
displeased - not pleased; experiencing or manifesting displeasure

offended

adjective upset, pained, hurt, bothered, disturbed, distressed, outraged, stung, put out (informal), grieved, disgruntled, agitated, ruffled, resentful, affronted, miffed (informal), displeased, in a huff, piqued, huffy She is terribly offended and hurt by personal remarks.
Translations

offended

[əˈfɛndɪd] adj [person] → offensé(e)

offended

adjbeleidigt, gekränkt; don’t be offendedseien Sie (doch) nicht beleidigt, nehmen Sie mir etc das nicht übel; to be offended by somethingsich von etw verletzt fühlen; to look offendedeine beleidigte Miene machen
References in classic literature ?
I am sorry I have offended your ladyship," answered Mrs Honour.
For that one could not blame even the laws of nature, though the laws of nature have continually all my life offended me more than anything.
She took the offended wife's hand; she appealed to the lawyer to reconsider that side of his theory which reflected harshly on Ferrari.
What I was going to say,' said the Dodo in an offended tone,
and why it is you hate--C and D,' she added in a whisper, half afraid that it would be offended again.
At this period of their Quarrel I entered the Library and was as you may imagine equally offended as Sophia at the ill-grounded accusations of the malevolent and contemptible Macdonald.
But he managed to appear so calm and easy, so respectful and self-possessed in his friendliness, that, though a little surprised, I was neither alarmed nor offended at the unusual liberty, and he walked with me under the ash-trees and by the water-side, and talked, with considerable animation, good taste, and intelligence, on many subjects, before I began to think about getting rid of him.
Will you promise not to be offended with me if I confess the truth?
In the year 1685, the state of Genoa having offended Louis XIV.
At nine o'clock the countess woke up, and Matrena Timofeevna, who had been her lady's maid before her marriage and now performed a sort of chief gendarme's duty for her, came to say that Madame Schoss was much offended and the young ladies' summer dresses could not be left behind.
I am very, very sorry we are to part -- so soon, and so suddenly too; but I am not offended, indeed I am not.
He had been disappointed in his certain hope of obtaining not only a beautiful, and, to him, highly attractive wife, but one whose rank and fortune might give brilliance to far inferior charms: he was likewise, no doubt, intensely mortified by his repulse, and deeply offended at the conduct of Miss Murray throughout.