offending


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of·fend

 (ə-fĕnd′)
v. of·fend·ed, of·fend·ing, of·fends
v.tr.
1. To cause displeasure, anger, resentment, or wounded feelings in: We were offended by his tasteless jokes.
2. To be displeasing or disagreeable to: Onions offend my sense of smell.
v.intr.
1. To result in displeasure: Bad manners may offend.
2.
a. To violate a moral or divine law; sin.
b. To violate a rule or law: offended against the curfew.

[Middle English offenden, from Old French offendre, from Latin offendere; see gwhen- in Indo-European roots.]

of·fend′er n.
Synonyms: offend, insult, affront, outrage
These verbs mean to cause resentment, humiliation, or hurt. To offend is to cause displeasure, wounded feelings, or repugnance in another: "He often offended men who might have been useful friends" (John Lothrop Motley).
Insult implies gross insensitivity, insolence, or contemptuous rudeness: "My father had insulted her by refusing to come to our wedding" (James Carroll).
To affront is to insult openly, usually intentionally: "He continued to belabor the poor woman in a studied effort to affront his hated chieftain" (Edgar Rice Burroughs).
Outrage implies the flagrant violation of a person's integrity, pride, or sense of right and decency: "He revered the men and women who transformed this piece of grassland into a great city, and he was outraged by the attacks on their reputation" (James S. Hirsch).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.offending - offending against or breaking a law or rule; "contracts offending against the statute were canceled"
unoffending - not offending; "an unoffending motorist should not have been stopped"

offending

adjective upsetting, disturbing, offensive, unpleasant, unsavoury, unpalatable, disagreeable The book was withdrawn and the offending passages deleted.
Translations

offending

[əˈfendɪŋ]
A. ADJ (esp hum) the dentist proceeded to fill the offending toothel dentista procedió a empastar el diente culpable
the book was withdrawn for the offending passages to be deletedel libro fue retirado para eliminar los pasajes responsables de la controversia
he put the offending object out of sightguardó el objeto causante del conflicto
he put the offending jacket back in the wardrobepuso de nuevo en el armario la chaqueta que según parecía era un atentado contra el buen gusto
B. CPD offending behaviour N [of criminal, delinquent] → conducta f delictiva

offending

[əˈfɛndɪŋ] adjincriminé(e)
the offending item → l'article incriminé

offending

adj
(= giving offence) remarkkränkend, beleidigend
(= law-breaking) personzuwiderhandelnd; behaviourkriminell; the offending party (Jur) → die schuldige Partei; (fig)der/die Schuldige
(= causing problem)störend; (= faulty) wire, partdefekt; the offending objectder Stein des Anstoßes

offending

[əˈfɛndɪŋ] adj (often) (hum) (word, object) → incriminato/a
References in classic literature ?
But I ask your ladyship's pardon; I could tear my tongue out for offending you.
I can have no intention of offending you, seeing that I am a total stranger to you and to Mr.
And that prince who, relying entirely on their promises, has neglected other precautions, is ruined; because friendships that are obtained by payments, and not by greatness or nobility of mind, may indeed be earned, but they are not secured, and in time of need cannot be relied upon; and men have less scruple in offending one who is beloved than one who is feared, for love is preserved by the link of obligation which, owing to the baseness of men, is broken at every opportunity for their advantage; but fear preserves you by a dread of punishment which never fails.
I was obliged at last almost entirely to remit my visits to the Grove, at the expense of deeply offending Mrs.
They will be more temperate and cool, and in that respect, as well as in others, will be more in capacity to act advisedly than the offending State.
Having committed one error in offending her, Moody committed another in attempting to make his peace with her.
why lots young grow out Professor He told the ECHO: "The peak offending age is the late teens, but the key thing is most people don't carry on beyond their mid-20s.
Cash held by White W hall to cover custody costs would be devolved and the money could be spent on improving services, such as drug and alcohol dependency programmes, to help prevent repeat offending, the IPPR said.
The paper explores the "structural and the cognitive changes associated with desistance from sexual offending against children" (p.
I am very pleased with the continued improvement in offending reduction among those on probation supervision.
The city's Youth Offending Services is looking to recruit volunteers to sit on panels which aim to offer support to young people aged 10 to 17 who have been in trouble with the police.
It's not for offending against reason but for injuring people's feelings, actually their feelings about their feelings, that the guilty are now called to prostrate themselves.