offend

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Related to offends: flouting

of·fend

 (ə-fĕnd′)
v. of·fend·ed, of·fend·ing, of·fends
v.tr.
1. To cause displeasure, anger, resentment, or wounded feelings in: We were offended by his tasteless jokes.
2. To be displeasing or disagreeable to: Onions offend my sense of smell.
v.intr.
1. To result in displeasure: Bad manners may offend.
2.
a. To violate a moral or divine law; sin.
b. To violate a rule or law: offended against the curfew.

[Middle English offenden, from Old French offendre, from Latin offendere; see gwhen- in Indo-European roots.]

of·fend′er n.
Synonyms: offend, insult, affront, outrage
These verbs mean to cause resentment, humiliation, or hurt. To offend is to cause displeasure, wounded feelings, or repugnance in another: "He often offended men who might have been useful friends" (John Lothrop Motley).
Insult implies gross insensitivity, insolence, or contemptuous rudeness: "My father had insulted her by refusing to come to our wedding" (James Carroll).
To affront is to insult openly, usually intentionally: "He continued to belabor the poor woman in a studied effort to affront his hated chieftain" (Edgar Rice Burroughs).
Outrage implies the flagrant violation of a person's integrity, pride, or sense of right and decency: "He revered the men and women who transformed this piece of grassland into a great city, and he was outraged by the attacks on their reputation" (James S. Hirsch).

offend

(əˈfɛnd)
vb
1. to hurt the feelings, sense of dignity, etc, of (a person)
2. (tr) to be disagreeable to; disgust: the smell offended him.
3. (intr except in archaic uses) to break (a law or laws in general)
[C14: via Old French offendre to strike against, from Latin offendere, from ob- against + fendere to strike]
ofˈfender n
ofˈfending adj

of•fend

(əˈfɛnd)
v.t.
1. to irritate, annoy, or anger; cause resentful displeasure in; insult.
2. to affect (the sense, taste, etc.) disagreeably.
3. to violate or transgress (a criminal, religious, or moral law).
4. to hurt or cause pain to.
5. (in Biblical use) to cause to fall into sinful ways.
v.i.
6. to cause resentful displeasure; irritate.
7. to err in conduct; commit a sin, crime, or fault.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Middle French offendre < Latin offendere to strike against, displease =of- of- + -fendere to strike]
of•fend′ed•ly, adv.
of•fend′er, n.

offend


Past participle: offended
Gerund: offending

Imperative
offend
offend
Present
I offend
you offend
he/she/it offends
we offend
you offend
they offend
Preterite
I offended
you offended
he/she/it offended
we offended
you offended
they offended
Present Continuous
I am offending
you are offending
he/she/it is offending
we are offending
you are offending
they are offending
Present Perfect
I have offended
you have offended
he/she/it has offended
we have offended
you have offended
they have offended
Past Continuous
I was offending
you were offending
he/she/it was offending
we were offending
you were offending
they were offending
Past Perfect
I had offended
you had offended
he/she/it had offended
we had offended
you had offended
they had offended
Future
I will offend
you will offend
he/she/it will offend
we will offend
you will offend
they will offend
Future Perfect
I will have offended
you will have offended
he/she/it will have offended
we will have offended
you will have offended
they will have offended
Future Continuous
I will be offending
you will be offending
he/she/it will be offending
we will be offending
you will be offending
they will be offending
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been offending
you have been offending
he/she/it has been offending
we have been offending
you have been offending
they have been offending
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been offending
you will have been offending
he/she/it will have been offending
we will have been offending
you will have been offending
they will have been offending
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been offending
you had been offending
he/she/it had been offending
we had been offending
you had been offending
they had been offending
Conditional
I would offend
you would offend
he/she/it would offend
we would offend
you would offend
they would offend
Past Conditional
I would have offended
you would have offended
he/she/it would have offended
we would have offended
you would have offended
they would have offended
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.offend - cause to feel resentment or indignation; "Her tactless remark offended me"
anger - make angry; "The news angered him"
2.offend - act in disregard of laws, rules, contracts, or promisesoffend - act in disregard of laws, rules, contracts, or promises; "offend all laws of humanity"; "violate the basic laws or human civilization"; "break a law"; "break a promise"
disrespect - show a lack of respect for
sin, transgress, trespass - commit a sin; violate a law of God or a moral law
blunder, boob, drop the ball, goof, sin - commit a faux pas or a fault or make a serious mistake; "I blundered during the job interview"
contravene, infringe, run afoul, conflict - go against, as of rules and laws; "He ran afoul of the law"; "This behavior conflicts with our rules"
trespass - break the law
trespass, intrude - enter unlawfully on someone's property; "Don't trespass on my land!"
3.offend - strike with disgust or revulsionoffend - strike with disgust or revulsion; "The scandalous behavior of this married woman shocked her friends"
churn up, sicken, disgust, nauseate, revolt - cause aversion in; offend the moral sense of; "The pornographic pictures sickened us"
4.offend - hurt the feelings of; "She hurt me when she did not include me among her guests"; "This remark really bruised my ego"
affront, diss, insult - treat, mention, or speak to rudely; "He insulted her with his rude remarks"; "the student who had betrayed his classmate was dissed by everyone"
arouse, elicit, evoke, provoke, enkindle, kindle, fire, raise - call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses); "arouse pity"; "raise a smile"; "evoke sympathy"
lacerate - deeply hurt the feelings of; distress; "his lacerating remarks"
sting - cause an emotional pain, as if by stinging; "His remark stung her"
abase, chagrin, humiliate, humble, mortify - cause to feel shame; hurt the pride of; "He humiliated his colleague by criticising him in front of the boss"

offend

verb
1. distress, upset, outrage, pain, wound, slight, provoke, insult, annoy, irritate, put down, dismay, snub, aggravate (informal), gall, agitate, ruffle, disconcert, vex, affront, displease, rile, pique, give offence, hurt (someone's) feelings, nark (Brit., Austral., & N.Z. slang), cut to the quick, miff (informal), tread on (someone's) toes (informal), piss you off (taboo slang), put (someone's) nose out of joint, put (someone's) back up, disgruntle, get (someone's) goat (slang) He had no intention of offending the community.
distress please, delight, soothe, appease, placate, assuage, mollify, conciliate
2. disgust, revolt, turn (someone) off (informal), put off, sicken, repel, repulse, nauseate, gross out (U.S. slang), make (someone) sick, turn your stomach, be disagreeable to, fill with loathing The smell of cigar smoke offends me.
3. break the law, sin, err, do wrong, fall, fall from grace, go astray alleged criminals who offend while on bail

offend

verb
1. To cause resentment or hurt by callous, rude behavior:
Idioms: add insult to injury, give offense to.
2. To be very disagreeable to:
Slang: turn off.
Idioms: give offense to, not set right with.
3. To violate a moral or divine law:
Translations
يُؤْذي، يُزْعِجيُسيِءُ إِلَىيُغيظ، يَجْرَح إحْساس
urazit
fornærmegeneregøre vred
loukataloukkaantuarikkoavietelläärsyttää
uvrijediti
sértvétkezikbánt
móîgavalda óòægindum
不快感を与える
위반하다
bjaurus charakterisįsižeistiįžeidžiantiskas įžeidžiakas žeidžia
aizskartaizvainotapvainotkaitināt
užaliti
förnärma
ทำให้ขุ่นเคือง
xúc phạm

offend

[əˈfend]
A. VTofender
to be offendedofenderse
he is easily offendedse ofende fácilmente
don't be offendedno te vayas a ofender
to be offended at or by sthofenderse por algo
to become offendedofenderse
it offends my ears/eyesme hace daño al oído/a la vista
to feel offendedsentirse ofendido
to look offendedponer cara de ofendido
to offend reasonir en contra de la razón
it offends my sense of justiceatenta contra mi sentido de la justicia
B. VI
1. (= cause offence) → ofender
scenes that may offendescenas que pueden ofender
to offend against [+ good taste] → atentar contra; [+ law] → infringir
to offend against Godpecar contra Dios
2. (criminally) (= commit an offence) → cometer una infracción; (= commit offences) → cometer infracciones
girls are less likely to offend than boyslas chicas son menos propensas a cometer infracciones que los chicos
to offend againreincidir

offend

[əˈfɛnd]
vt [+ person] → offenser
vi (= commit an offence) → commettre une infraction
offend against
vt fus [+ law, rule] → contrevenir à, enfreindre

offend

vt
(= hurt feelings of)kränken; (= be disagreeable to)Anstoß erregen bei; this novel would offend a lot of peopledieser Roman würde bei vielen Leuten Anstoß erregen
ear, eyebeleidigen; reasonverstoßen gegen; sense of justicegehen gegen, verletzen
vi
(= give offence)beleidigend sein
(= do wrong)(ein) Unrecht tun, unrecht tun

offend

[əˈfɛnd]
1. vt (person) → offendere; (ears, eyes) → ferire
it offends my sense of justice → è un'offesa al mio senso di giustizia
to be offended (at) → offendersi (per)
2. vi to offend against (law, rule) → trasgredire, contravvenire a; (God) → disubbidire a; (common sense) → andare contro; (good taste) → offendere

offend

(əˈfend) verb
1. to make feel upset or angry. If you don't go to her party she will be offended; His criticism offended her.
2. to be unpleasant or disagreeable. Cigarette smoke offends me.
ofˈfence , (American) ofˈfense noun
1. (any cause of) anger, displeasure, hurt feelings etc. That rubbish dump is an offence to the eye.
2. a crime. The police charged him with several offences.
ofˈfender noun
a person who offends, especially against the law.
ofˈfensive (-siv) adjective
1. insulting. offensive remarks.
2. disgusting. an offensive smell.
3. used to attack. an offensive weapon.
noun
an attack. They launched an offensive against the invading army.
ofˈfensively adverb
ofˈfensiveness noun
be on the offensive
to be making an attack. She always expects people to criticize her and so she is always on the offensive.
take offence (with at)
to be offended (by something). He took offence at what she said.

offend

يُسيِءُ إِلَى urazit fornærme beleidigen θίγω ofender loukata offusquer uvrijediti offendere 不快感を与える 위반하다 beledigen fornærme obrazić ofender оскорбить förnärma ทำให้ขุ่นเคือง gücendirmek xúc phạm 犯罪

offend

v. ofender, insultar, agraviar.
References in classic literature ?
Having in vain attempted to raise his hand to his eyes, he said to Wamba, who, seeing his master's ill humour had prudently retreated to the rear, ``I pray thee, do me the kindness to wipe my eyes with the skirt of thy mantle; the dust offends me, and these bonds will not let me help myself one way or another.
Let them bring me a comb here, or what they please, and curry this beard of mine, and if they get anything out of it that offends against cleanliness, let them clip me to the skin.
But if he offends them he will have to learn another sort of lesson.
I may also enjoy the precious privilege of assuring you of my fond, faithful, and unalterable affection, whenever you visit your favorite bower, unless, indeed, it offends your pride to listen to professions of love from the lips of a poor workingman, clad in a blouse and cap.
Again the writer draws from the washing the body of Patroclus--which offends.
No man shall die save he who offends against the laws.
Besides, I do not see in what an honest man, when he asks of his king how he has ill-served him, offends him.
At the same time I confess that I have a prejudice against certain words that I cannot overcome; the sight of some offends me, the sound of others, and rather than use one of those detested vocables, even when I perceive that it would convey my exact meaning, I would cast about long for some other.
Dear old Woola," she said; "no love could be deeper than yours, yet it never offends.
Therefore, he who despises the tulip offends God beyond measure.
The homely word JOB, like much that I have written, offends you.
A literary man becomes professor of something or other, or a journalist at a hundred francs for a thousand lines; he writes "feuilletons," or he gets into Saint-Pelagie for a brilliant article that offends the Jesuits,--which of course is an immense benefit to him and makes him a politician at once.