offeree


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offeree

(ɒfəˈriː)
n
1. (Law) law finance the person who receives an offer
2. (Banking & Finance) law finance the person who receives an offer
References in periodicals archive ?
It is thought that dispatch should appropriately refer to the computer of the offeree rather than the computer of the service provider of the offeree.
(art.7.2) A bilateral contract becomes effective when the offeror learns of the offeree's acceptance; (art.9.1) a unilateral contract becomes effective when the offeree begins the requested performance.
In the ultimatum game, an offeror and offeree must cooperate to take home a set amount of money.
She also confirmed what any experienced clicker trainer knows: that more valuable long-term goals are without a doubt better served by clicker training than by the use offeree and coercion.
In the absence of such understanding, as Dostoevsky wrote in The Idiot, "from the right offeree it is not far to the right of tigers and crocodiles." (16) Unfortunately, the "right of force" has often manifested itself unopposed among critics of modern culture.
This would leave Dawson, the offeree, without a remedy.
The placement, to one Exempt Offeree under section 708 of the Corporations Law, is being undertaken at a price comparable to recent market prices, indicating good support for the Company's current plans, particularly in the Canning Basin, and settlement is expected by 30 July 2010.
between the issuer and the offeree, which helps determine whether the
The offeree accepts if their reservation quality level is exceeded, so the more risk averse the offeree, the more likely the acceptance occurs.
While it has become the flavor of the month to Dubai-bash, I believe that Dubai has something great to offerEe if you know where to look.
To these features later commentators added: (a) the continuing and general nature of the offer, (b) the monopolistic position or at least the great economic power of the offeror, (c) a widespread demand for the goods or services offered, and (d) the use of standard forms of type contracts, and stipulations of which serve mostly the interests of type offeror and the reading, let alone the understanding of which, presents difficulties to the offeree. To this definition nothing substantial was added later; merely the description of the offeror's position was changed to the modern version of "superior bargaining power" "or substantive imbalance"".
To be valid, the acceptance of an offer must be made while the offer is still operative, must be made by the offeree (if bilateral), must match the terms of the offer, and may be written, oral, or inferred from conduct.