officiate

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of·fi·ci·ate

 (ə-fĭsh′ē-āt′)
v. of·fi·ci·at·ed, of·fi·ci·at·ing, of·fi·ci·ates
v.intr.
1. To perform the duties and functions of an office or a position of authority.
2. To serve as an officiant.
3. Sports To serve as a referee or umpire.
v.tr. Usage Problem
1. To perform from a position of authority (an official duty or function).
2. To serve as an officiant at (a ceremony): officiated the wedding ceremony.
3. To serve as a referee or umpire at (a game): officiated the hockey game.

[Medieval Latin officiāre, officiāt-, to conduct, from Latin officium, service, duty; see office.]

of·fi′ci·a′tion n.
of·fi′ci·a′tor n.
Usage Note: Officiate has long seen use as an intransitive verb, but it has recently developed transitive uses. In our 1997 survey, 91 percent of the Usage Panel approved of the intransitive use, as in the sentence The wedding was held in the garden, a minister and priest officiating. The Panel views transitive uses of the verb less favorably. In our 2009 survey, only 45 percent approved of the use of officiate in sporting contexts in the sentence He officiated National Hockey League games for 15 years. This percentage of approval, however, had risen from 38 percent in 1997. Support for officiate with a direct object in more traditional contexts, such as weddings, was somewhat lower. Only 34 percent approved of the sentence A minister officiated the wedding, which was held in a garden. Resistance in this case has not weakened since 1997.

officiate

(əˈfɪʃɪˌeɪt)
vb (intr)
1. to hold the position, responsibility, or function of an official
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) to conduct a religious or other ceremony
[C17: from Medieval Latin officiāre, from Latin officium; see office]
ofˌficiˈation n
ofˈficiˌator n

of•fi•ci•ate

(əˈfɪʃ iˌeɪt)

v.i. -at•ed, -at•ing.
1. to perform the duties or function of some office or position.
2. to perform the office of a cleric.
3. to serve as referee, umpire, etc., in a contest or game.
[1625–35; < Medieval Latin officiāre to serve]
of•fi`ci•a′tion, n.
of•fi′ci•a`tor, n.

officiate


Past participle: officiated
Gerund: officiating

Imperative
officiate
officiate
Present
I officiate
you officiate
he/she/it officiates
we officiate
you officiate
they officiate
Preterite
I officiated
you officiated
he/she/it officiated
we officiated
you officiated
they officiated
Present Continuous
I am officiating
you are officiating
he/she/it is officiating
we are officiating
you are officiating
they are officiating
Present Perfect
I have officiated
you have officiated
he/she/it has officiated
we have officiated
you have officiated
they have officiated
Past Continuous
I was officiating
you were officiating
he/she/it was officiating
we were officiating
you were officiating
they were officiating
Past Perfect
I had officiated
you had officiated
he/she/it had officiated
we had officiated
you had officiated
they had officiated
Future
I will officiate
you will officiate
he/she/it will officiate
we will officiate
you will officiate
they will officiate
Future Perfect
I will have officiated
you will have officiated
he/she/it will have officiated
we will have officiated
you will have officiated
they will have officiated
Future Continuous
I will be officiating
you will be officiating
he/she/it will be officiating
we will be officiating
you will be officiating
they will be officiating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been officiating
you have been officiating
he/she/it has been officiating
we have been officiating
you have been officiating
they have been officiating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been officiating
you will have been officiating
he/she/it will have been officiating
we will have been officiating
you will have been officiating
they will have been officiating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been officiating
you had been officiating
he/she/it had been officiating
we had been officiating
you had been officiating
they had been officiating
Conditional
I would officiate
you would officiate
he/she/it would officiate
we would officiate
you would officiate
they would officiate
Past Conditional
I would have officiated
you would have officiated
he/she/it would have officiated
we would have officiated
you would have officiated
they would have officiated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.officiate - act in an official capacity in a ceremony or religious ritual, such as a wedding; "Who officiated at your wedding?"
perform - perform a function; "Who will perform the wedding?"
marry, splice, wed, tie - perform a marriage ceremony; "The minister married us on Saturday"; "We were wed the following week"; "The couple got spliced on Hawaii"
2.officiate - perform duties attached to a particular office or place or function; "His wife officiated as his private secretary"
serve - do duty or hold offices; serve in a specific function; "He served as head of the department for three years"; "She served in Congress for two terms"

officiate

verb
1. preside, perform, conduct, celebrate, solemnize Bishop Silvester officiated at the funeral.
2. superintend, supervise, be in charge, run, control, serve, manage, direct, handle, chair, look after, overlook, oversee, preside, take charge, adjudicate, emcee (informal) He has been chosen to officiate at the cup final.

officiate

verb
To perform the duties of another:
Translations
يَقوم بِمَراسيم دينِيَّه
forrette
misézikszolgál
gegna embættisskyldum
icra etmekmerasim yönetmek

officiate

[əˈfɪʃɪeɪt] VIoficiar
to officiate as Mayorejercer las funciones de alcalde
to officiate at a marriageoficiar un enlace or una boda

officiate

[əˈfɪʃieɪt] vi
[priest] → officier
to officiate at a marriage → célébrer un mariage
(= act) to officiate as Mayor → exercer les fonctions de maire

officiate

vtamtieren, fungieren (at bei); to officiate as presidentals Präsident fungieren, das Amt des Präsidenten ausüben; to officiate at a weddingeine Trauung vornehmen

officiate

[əˈfɪʃɪˌeɪt] vi (Rel) → ufficiare
to officiate as Mayor → esplicare le funzioni di sindaco
to officiate at a marriage → celebrare un matrimonio

officially

(əˈfiʃəli) adverb
1. (negative unofficially) as an official. He attended the ceremony officially.
2. formally. The new library was officially opened yesterday.
3. according to what is announced publicly (though not necessarily true in fact). Officially he is on holiday – actually he is working on a new book.
officiate (əˈfiʃieit) verb
to do the duty or service of an office or official position. The new clergyman officiated at the wedding.
officious (əˈfiʃəs) adjective
offering help etc in order to interfere. His mother-in-law is so officious that he does not let her visit his house.
ofˈficiously adverb
ofˈficiousness noun
ˈoffice-bearer noun
a person who holds a position of authority in a society etc.
through the (kind) offices of
with the help of. I got the job through the kind offices of a friend.
References in classic literature ?
She had officiated as nurse to Miss Bridget, in a violent fit of illness, and had sat up many nights with that lady; besides which, she had been seen there the very day before Mr Allworthy's return, by Mrs Wilkins herself, though that sagacious person had not at first conceived any suspicion of her on that account: for, as she herself said, "She had always esteemed Jenny as a very sober girl (though indeed she knew very little of her), and had rather suspected some of those wanton trollops, who gave themselves airs, because, forsooth, they thought themselves handsome.
Only this morning I officiated at early celebration "
For my own part, with the assistance of my valet, who, as I have before stated, always officiated as spoon on these occasions, I ate sparingly from one of Tinor's trenchers, of poee-poee; which was devoted exclusively for my own use, being mixed with the milky meat of ripe cocoanut.
Having covered the body with sand and flints, they kneeled along the grave in a double row, with their faces turned to the east, while one who officiated as a priest sprinkled them with water from a hat.
Parker, who officiated, remarked, when all was over, to a few particular friends, and with some equivocation, as it seems to me, that he 'buried her very willingly, and with much satisfaction.
He had previously experienced a great consolation and spiritual exaltation when receiving communion, and now when he himself officiated, the performance of the preparation filled him with ecstatic and deep emotion.
Broad has so far officiated in 461 international matches comprising 93 Tests, 294 ODIs, and 74 T20 matches.
Brannock and Grumley officiated the state finals in 2004 and 2005 and retired in 2010 and 2011.
It was at the an All India tournament where I first officiated as an Umpire.
The UAAP has suspended the referees, who officiated in La Salle's controversial 82-75 win over Adamson in their UAAP Season 80 Final Four duel.
According to Oman Cricket, Rahul has officiated in ACC Under-16 Tournament and the recently concluded ICC WCL 1 Asia Qualifier held in Thailand.
He was appointed to stand in the final of the 2007 Cricket World Cup between Australia and Sri Lanka, where he officiated with Steve Bucknor.