offshoring


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offshoring

basing a company’s operations overseas to take advantage of lower costs
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

off·shore

 (ôf′shôr′, ŏf′-)
adj.
1. Moving or directed away from the shore: an offshore wind.
2.
a. Located at a distance from the shore: an offshore mooring; offshore oil-drilling platforms.
b. Located or based in a foreign country and not subject to tax laws: offshore bank accounts; offshore investments.
adv.
1. Away from the shore: The storm moved offshore.
2. At a distance from the shore: a boat moored offshore.
n.
The comparatively flat region of submerged land extending seaward from beyond the region where breakers form to the edge of the continental shelf.
tr.v. off·shored, off·shor·ing, off·shores
To outsource (production or services) to another country.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

offshoring

(ˈɒfˌʃɔːrɪŋ)
n
(Commerce) the practice of moving a company's operating base to a foreign country where labour costs are cheaper
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
offshoring
References in periodicals archive ?
These are among the findings of the sixth annual study on corporations' offshoring trends by Duke University's Fuqua School of Business and The Conference Board, an independent research association.
firms engaged in offshoring say a shortage of skilled domestic employees--not cost-cutting--is the primary reason why they move some job functions overseas.
While most of the subjects in Deal Talk focus on the state of the industry as it relates to mergers and acquisitions and capital-raising activities, the topic of business process offshoring is an important one for management teams to evaluate--particularly in the current market environment.
Offshoring is saving the sector an estimated pounds 4.5 billion a year, up from around pounds 2.5 billion a year ago, propelled by an 1,800 per cent increase in headcount over the last four years.
Offshoring also reduces the tax ratable value of commercial and industrial properties in the US, while resulting indirectly in further job losses from support industries, reports America's Economy In The 21st Century: Pollina Corporate Top 10 Pro-Business States 2006.
Much attention has focused on the "offshoring" of services to lower-wage locations abroad.
William Brittain-Catlin is the author of Offshore: The Dark Side of the Global Economy, an examination of the pervasive phenomenon of financial offshoring. He is a producer for the BBC, a former investigator with Kroll, Inc., a major corporate risk consulting company, and a consultant for Control Risks, another business risk consulting firm.
Offshoring, the outsourcing of jobs to foreign countries, poses one of the biggest threats to U.S.
It's tax-preparation and financial-services outsourcing--called offshoring when the work is done overseas and nearshoring if it's done in Canada or Mexico.
Free market champions, such as the likes of Microsoft and Dell, tout outsourcing and offshoring as the logical developments of a global economy based on accelerated innovation and technology; the "invisible hand" surfs the net.
Congress last January, Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina said, "There is no job that is America's God-given right anymore." Her frankness drew heavy criticism, but it was clear by that time that lines were drawn in the sand on globalization and offshoring.