ogre


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to ogre: Ogrish

o·gre

 (ō′gər)
n.
1. A giant or monster in legends and fairy tales that eats humans.
2. A person who is felt to be particularly cruel, brutish, or hideous.

[French, probably ultimately from Latin Orcus, god of the underworld.]

o′gre·ish (ō′gər-ĭsh, ō′grĭsh) adj.

ogre

(ˈəʊɡə)
n
1. (European Myth & Legend) (in folklore) a giant, usually given to eating human flesh
2. any monstrous or cruel person
[C18: from French, perhaps from Latin Orcus god of the infernal regions]
ˈogreish adj
ˈogress fem n

o•gre

(ˈoʊ gər)

n.
1. a monster in fairy tales, usu. represented as a hideous giant who feeds on human flesh.
2. a monstrously ugly, cruel, or barbarous person.
[1705–15; < French, perhaps « Latin Orcus Orcus]
o′gre•ish, o•grish (ˈoʊ grɪʃ) adj.
o′gre•ish•ly, o′grish•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ogre - a cruel wicked and inhuman personogre - a cruel wicked and inhuman person  
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable
demoniac - someone who acts as if possessed by a demon
2.ogre - (folklore) a giant who likes to eat human beings
folklore - the unwritten lore (stories and proverbs and riddles and songs) of a culture
giant - an imaginary figure of superhuman size and strength; appears in folklore and fairy tales
ogress - (folklore) a female ogre

ogre

noun
1. fiend, monster, beast, villain, brute, bogeyman Some people think of bank managers as ogres.
2. monster, giant, devil, beast, demon, bogey, spectre, fiend, ghoul, bogeyman, bugbear an ogre in a fairy tale

ogre

noun
A perversely bad, cruel, or wicked person:
Translations
غول
ogre
obr lidožroutzlobr
uhyre
hirviöjättijättiläinenraakalainen
emberevõ óriásogre
tröll
milzis cilvēkēdājs
oger
ogr
ogroogre
obor-ľudožrút
rese

ogre

[ˈəʊgəʳ] Nogro m

ogre

[ˈəʊgər] nogre m

ogre

n (Myth) → Menschen fressender Riese; (fig)Ungeheuer nt, → Unmensch m

ogre

[ˈəʊgəʳ] norco

ogre

(ˈəugə) noun
in fairy stories, a frightening, cruel giant.
References in classic literature ?
So, with Spartan firmness, the young authoress laid her first-born on her table, and chopped it up as ruthlessly as any ogre.
Do you suppose I eat like an ogre or a ghoul, that you dread being the companion of my repast?
I implored him to spare her gentle nature - not to crush a fragile flower - and addressed him generally, to the best of my remembrance, as if, instead of being her father, he had been an Ogre, or the Dragon of Wantley.
She really was a most charming girl, and might have passed for a captive fairy, whom that truculent Ogre, Old Barley, had pressed into his service.
Aaron was not indisposed to display his talents, even to an ogre, under protecting circumstances; and after a few more signs of coyness, consisting chiefly in rubbing the backs of his hands over his eyes, and then peeping between them at Master Marner, to see if he looked anxious for the "carril", he at length allowed his head to be duly adjusted, and standing behind the table, which let him appear above it only as far as his broad frill, so that he looked like a cherubic head untroubled with a body, he began with a clear chirp, and in a melody that had the rhythm of an industrious hammer
Though his long slim legs, supporting a lank body, and his pallid skin, were not indicative of health, Monsieur de Valois ate like an ogre and declared he had a malady called in the provinces "hot liver," perhaps to excuse his monstrous appetite.
Their hearts sank as they heard me, for they remembered how they had been treated by the Laestrygonian Antiphates, and by the savage ogre Polyphemus.
Meanwhile he was under the fatal necessity of being very kind to this ogre, and of providing a large breakfast for him when they stopped at a roadside inn.
The most awful circumstance of the affair is yet to be told: for this ogre, or whatever it was, had a riding habit like Mrs.
But both Flambeau and Father Brown have often confessed that, in all their (often outrageous) adventures, nothing had so chilled their blood as that voice of an ogre, sounding suddenly out of a silent and empty inn.
You might suppose him to be an ogre from what he says, and I believe he has the reputation of one with some people.
He had been to visit his friend the Cornish ogre, and had stayed with him for seven years.