oilbird

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oil·bird

 (oil′bûrd′)
n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

oilbird

(ˈɔɪlˌbɜːd)
n
(Animals) a nocturnal gregarious cave-dwelling bird, Steatornis caripensis, of N South America and Trinidad, having a hooked bill and dark plumage: family Steatornithidae, order Caprimulgiformes. Also called: fatbird or guacharo
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

oil•bird

(ˈɔɪlˌbɜrd)

n.
a nocturnal cave-nesting bird of tropical South America, Steatornis caripensis, akin to the goatsuckers: the rendered fat of its young has been used as a cooking and lighting oil.
[1890]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oilbird - nocturnal fruit-eating bird of South America that has fatty young yielding an oil that is used instead of butteroilbird - nocturnal fruit-eating bird of South America that has fatty young yielding an oil that is used instead of butter
caprimulgiform bird - long-winged nonpasserine birds
genus Steatornis, Steatornis - type and sole genus of the family Steatornithidae
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides bats, other mammals such as whales, dolphins, shrews and tenrecs as well as birds such as oilbirds and swiftlets are known to use echolocation to navigate, investigate their habitat and search for food.
Seeds are primarily dispersed by Oilbirds (Steatornis caripensis) and several species of Toucans (Ramphastidae).
Most frugivores either supplement their diet with small amounts of animal food or other protein sources (e.g., cedar waxwings, Bombycilla cedrorum; Witmer, 1998) or are able to subsist on little dietary protein (e.g., oilbirds, Steatornis caripensis; Snow, 1962).