ojime


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ojime

(ˈəʊdʒɪˌmeɪ)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) a Japanese bead which is used to secure cords in place
References in periodicals archive ?
W badaniach opublikowanych przez Ojime zawyzenie wynikow ilosciowych badan kwarcu stanowiacego 20-50% masy analizowanych probek, spowodowane krzemionka bezpostaciowa i kaolinitem, wynosilo srednio 57% i 50% [10].
Netsuke are usually accompanied by an ojime, and were intended to secure the inro to the obi...
Inro are beautifully crafted boxes which emerged as the most popular type of sagemono, while the ojime is a sliding bead through which the cord holding the box passes, keeping the inro closed.
These were held shut by ojime, or sliding beads, and the cord secured to the sash with the netsuke.
Also highlighting the event are Ming Dynasty porcelains (including 15th- and 16th-century examples) and carved jades from a second prestigious East Coast collection; and a collection of rare contemporary carved netsuke and Ojime pieces.
The current catalogue of Japanese antique Netsuke, Ojime and Lacquer is available for viewing and free download at their Japanese Art Blog (see link on their website).
A sliding bead, called an ojime, ran along the length of the cord to both open and close the sagemono.
and international exhibitors will feature textiles from the Far East in addition to an array of Asian art and artifacts, including screens, sculpture, jades, netsuke, inro, ojime, lacquer, bronzes, ceramics, furniture, jewelry, paintings and photographs.
It is called an ojime which slides down silk cord to the top of the first inro section thus preventing movement.
A sliding bead (ojime), which was strung on the cord, would tighten or loosen the opening of the hanging objects (sagemono).