old-line


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Related to old-line: misjudging

old-line

(ōld′līn′)
adj.
1. Adhering to conservative or reactionary principles: an old-line senator.
2. Long established: an old-line New England family.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

old-line

adj
1. US and Canadian conservative; old-fashioned
2. well-established; traditional
ˌold-ˈliner n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

old′-line′



adj.
1. following or supporting conservative or traditional ideas, customs, etc.
2. traditional; established.
[1855–60]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.old-line - adhering to conservative or reactionary principles; "an oldline senator"
right - of or belonging to the political or intellectual right
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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Despite its spectacular role in fueling twentieth century prosperity, consumer credit had an uphill battle in winning approval from many traditionally oriented social workers, economists, clergy, and newspaper editors, as well as old-line bankers and retailers.