old-maidish


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old maid

n.
1. Offensive Used as a disparaging term for a woman who is no longer young and has not married.
2. Informal A person regarded as being primly fastidious.
3. Games
a. A card game in which players match cards into pairs using a deck that has an odd number of cards. The player who holds the unmatched card at the end loses.
b. The loser of this game.

old′-maid′ish (-mā′dĭsh) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.old-maidish - primly fastidious
fastidious - giving careful attention to detail; hard to please; excessively concerned with cleanliness; "a fastidious and incisive intellect"; "fastidious about personal cleanliness"

old-maidish

adjective
Marked by excessive concern for propriety and good form:
Translations

old-maidish

[ˈəʊldˈmeɪdɪʃ] ADJ (= spinsterish) → de solterona; (= fussy) → remilgado
References in classic literature ?
A gentle, old-maidish person and a sweet young girl of seventeen sat right in front of us that night at the Mannheim opera.
The Irwines should dine with him every week, and have their own carriage to come in, for in some very delicate way that Arthur would devise, the lay-impropriator of the Hayslope tithes would insist on paying a couple of hundreds more to the vicar; and his aunt should be as comfortable as possible, and go on living at the Chase, if she liked, in spite of her old-maidish ways--at least until he was married, and that event lay in the indistinct background, for Arthur had not yet seen the woman who would play the lady-wife to the first-rate country gentleman.
But Frieda was looking the other way, and Margaret travelled on to town feeling solitary and old-maidish.