olfactory lobe


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Related to olfactory lobe: bulbus olfactorius

olfactory lobe

n.
A projection of the lower anterior portion of each cerebral hemisphere, functioning in the sense of smell.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

olfac′tory lobe`



n.
the anterior part of each cerebral hemisphere, involved with olfactory functions.
[1855–60]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other, nonmotor symptoms of PD include loss of the sense of smell (due to the presence of Lewy bodies in the olfactory lobe) and constipation, sleep disorders, and hypotension (low blood pressure when standing up).
1: Occipital bone; 2: Parietal bone; 3: Frontal bone; 4: Frontal sinus; 5: Sphenoid bone; 6:Occipital bone; 7:Atlas; 8:Axis; 9: Nuchal ligament; 10: Dorsal rectus muscle of the head, 11: Semispinalis capitis muscle; 12: Ventral rectus muscle and long muscle of the head; 13: Olfactory lobe; 14: Left cerebral hemisphere; 15:Cerebellum; 16: Spinal cord; 17: Epidural rostral rete, rostral part; 18:Rostral cavernous sinus; 19: Caudal cavernous sinus; 20: Ventral petrosal sinus; 21: Basilar venous plexus; 22:Occiput atloi'dien venous plexus; 23:Internal vertebral venous plexus.
To address questions of spatial summation within the aesthetasc array and competency of ORNs along the array, we designed an olfactometer to effect regional stimulation of the aesthetasc array while recording electrical activity from olfactory lobe (OL) interneurons in the brain of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii Girard.
Many four-legged animals including dogs have a keen sense of smell and are macrosmatic, which means they have a greater level of olfactory function with a complex nose design, as well as a large olfactory lobe in the brain.
Dianne Ackerman, author of A Natural History of the Senses, explains that our sense of smell developed from the oldest part of our brain, the olfactory lobe. Thus plant odorants (tiny molecules that carry odors) have a long shelf life in our memory.
Most aromatherapies are inhalation-based and work by stimulating the brain's olfactory lobe, which affects the emotions.
In the highest part of the nasal cavity are olfactory nerves which pick up smell and send its sensations to the olfactory lobe of the brain which records the smell.