oligarchy


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Related to oligarchy: autocracy

ol·i·gar·chy

 (ŏl′ĭ-gär′kē, ō′lĭ-)
n. pl. ol·i·gar·chies
1.
a. Government by a few, especially by a small faction of persons or families.
b. Those making up such a government.
2. A state governed by a few persons.

ol′i·gar′chic, ol′i·gar′chi·cal adj.

oligarchy

(ˈɒlɪˌɡɑːkɪ)
n, pl -chies
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) government by a small group of people
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a state or organization so governed
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a small body of individuals ruling such a state
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) chiefly US a small clique of private citizens who exert a strong influence on government
[C16: via Medieval Latin from Greek oligarkhia, from olígos few + -archy]
ˌoliˈgarchic, ˌoliˈgarchical, ˌoliˈgarchal adj
ˌoliˈgarchically adv

ol•i•gar•chy

(ˈɒl ɪˌgɑr ki)

n., pl. -chies.
1. a form of government in which power is vested in a few persons or in a dominant class or clique.
2. a state or organization so ruled.
3. the persons or class so ruling.
[1570–80; < Medieval Latin oligarchia < Greek oligarchía. See olig-, -archy]
ol`i•gar′chic, ol`i•gar′chi•cal, adj.

oligarchy

1. a system of rule by a few persons.
2. the people who form such a government. — oligarch, n.oligarchie, oligarchical, adj.
See also: Government

oligarchy

1. Government by a small faction or group of families, from Greek words meaning “a few” and “chief” or “principal.”
2. A form of government in which power is held by a small group of people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oligarchy - a political system governed by a few people; "one of his cardinal convictions was that Britain was not run as a democracy but as an oligarchy"; "the big cities were notoriously in the hands of the oligarchy of local businessmen"
form of government, political system - the members of a social organization who are in power
Translations

oligarchy

[ˈɒlɪgɑːkɪ] Noligarquía f

oligarchy

[ˈɒlɪgɑːrki] n
(= group) → oligarchie f
(= form of government) → oligarchie f

oligarchy

nOligarchie f

oligarchy

[ˈɒlɪˌgɑːkɪ] noligarchia
References in classic literature ?
Not alone do we understand Avis Everhard's love for her hero-husband, but we feel, as he felt, in those first days, the vague and terrible loom of the Oligarchy.
This is, without discussion, the earliest-known occasion on which the Oligarchy was so designated.
The rise of the Oligarchy will always remain a cause of secret wonder to the historian and the philosopher.
Instead of which, appalling alike to us who look back and to those that lived at the time, capitalism, rotten-ripe, sent forth that monstrous offshoot, the Oligarchy.
Even as it was divined, the Oligarchy was there--a fact established in blood, a stupendous and awful reality.
Now he is desirous to have his whole plan of government neither a democracy nor an oligarchy, but something between both, which he calls a polity, for it is to be composed of men-at-arms.
But now in this government of Plato's there are no traces of a monarchy, only of an oligarchy and democracy; though he seems to choose that it should rather incline to an oligarchy, as is evident from the appointment of the magistrates; for to choose them by lot is common to both; but that a man of fortune must necessarily be a member of the assembly, or to elect the magistrates, or take part in the management of public affairs, while others are passed over, makes the state incline to an oligarchy; as does the endeavouring that the greater part of the rich may be in office, and that the rank of their appointments may correspond with their fortunes.
Presumably the other 59% have no interest whether the UK is run by democracy, dictator, monarch or oligarchy.
Nobody can now be in any doubt about my views of the corrupt oligarchy in Brussels, but this does not detract from my admiration for the people of Europe and their civilisation; I want to see both them and us freed from an oppressive regime which exists only for its own aggrandisement.
John's College, Annapolis) attempts to show that despite the typical thought that Plato's Republic recommends a totalitarian government, the classic work actually intended to demonstrate the superiority of a democratic constitution by constructing a view of the Peloponnesian War in which Athens' victory vindicates its democratic values against the oligarchy of Sparta.
It also doesn't turn a blind eye to potentially sham democracies such as Russia's growing oligarchy, deep with corruption from organized crime.
IT now seems that once a week the Echo reports that Rhodri Morgan and his oligarchy are spending our money on any whim they choose.