oligopoly

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ol·i·gop·o·ly

 (ŏl′ĭ-gŏp′ə-lē, ō′lĭ-)
n. pl. ol·i·gop·o·lies
A market condition in which sellers are so few that the actions of any one of them will materially affect price and have a measurable impact on competitors.


ol′i·gop′o·lis′tic (-lĭs′tĭk) adj.

oligopoly

(ˌɒlɪˈɡɒpəlɪ)
n, pl -lies
(Economics) economics a market situation in which control over the supply of a commodity is held by a small number of producers each of whom is able to influence prices and thus directly affect the position of competitors
[C20: from oligo- + Greek pōlein to sell, on the model of monopoly]
ˌoliˌgopoˈlistic adj

ol•i•gop•o•ly

(ˌɒl ɪˈgɒp ə li)

n., pl. -lies.
a market situation in which prices and other factors are controlled by a few sellers.
[1890–95; oligo- + (mono) poly]
ol`i•gop`o•lis′tic, adj.

oligopoly

the market condition that exists when there are few sellers. — oligopolistic, adj.
See also: Trade

oligopoly

The control of a market by a small number of suppliers of goods or services.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oligopoly - (economics) a market in which control over the supply of a commodity is in the hands of a small number of producers and each one can influence prices and affect competitors
market, marketplace, market place - the world of commercial activity where goods and services are bought and sold; "without competition there would be no market"; "they were driven from the marketplace"
economic science, economics, political economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their management
Translations

oligopoly

[ˌɒlɪˈgɒpəlɪ] Noligopolio m
References in periodicals archive ?
These billionaires are actually the biggest architects of oligopolies like Bill Gates of Microsoft, Jeff Bezos of Amazon and Jack Ma of Alibaba.
For example, a consolidated industry (e.g., oligopolies or cartels) has one or two dominate firms with a clear value chain structure, which allow incumbent firms to benefit from the strong structural mechanisms of high entry and exit barriers (Williamson, 1975).
The former Chief Justice likewise stressed that the proposed federal Charter would prohibit monopolies and oligopolies 'that substantially lessen competition in the market and abuse their dominant positions.'
Locally, some industries are dominated by monopolies, duopolies and oligopolies, whereby consumers are at their mercy with fewer choices.
Breaking firms up is the knee-jerk regulatory reaction to oligopolies.
What does make sense is maximizing the economic rent through price-leadership and other semi-collusive pricing actions, as many oligopolies do.
The case of economists generally divides market structure into four types: monopolies, monopolistic competition, oligopolies, and complete competition.
Table 1 compares the fees paid by distributors to selected independent channels as well as to comparably rated channels owned by oligopolies. The table makes clear that ratings and household delivery do not directly translate into the value of subscriber fees that distributors will grant to independent networks.
Oligopolies also make it far harder for small-to-medium sized businesses (SMEs) to obtain the credit they need to run and expand their businesses.
A more difficult issue is that whilst the SMP framework is an effective means of addressing concerns arising from single firm dominance, it does not deal effectively with oligopolies. This is a problem because a key market trend for both fixed and mobile is towards a limited number of end-to-end competitors --more than one, but not many.
In this short treatise, Khemraj presents a theoretical framework for accounting for bank oligopolies in developing economies, in contrast to typical analyses assuming capital markets.