oligopoly

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ol·i·gop·o·ly

 (ŏl′ĭ-gŏp′ə-lē, ō′lĭ-)
n. pl. ol·i·gop·o·lies
A market condition in which sellers are so few that the actions of any one of them will materially affect price and have a measurable impact on competitors.


ol′i·gop′o·lis′tic (-lĭs′tĭk) adj.

oligopoly

(ˌɒlɪˈɡɒpəlɪ)
n, pl -lies
(Economics) economics a market situation in which control over the supply of a commodity is held by a small number of producers each of whom is able to influence prices and thus directly affect the position of competitors
[C20: from oligo- + Greek pōlein to sell, on the model of monopoly]
ˌoliˌgopoˈlistic adj

ol•i•gop•o•ly

(ˌɒl ɪˈgɒp ə li)

n., pl. -lies.
a market situation in which prices and other factors are controlled by a few sellers.
[1890–95; oligo- + (mono) poly]
ol`i•gop`o•lis′tic, adj.

oligopoly

the market condition that exists when there are few sellers. — oligopolistic, adj.
See also: Trade

oligopoly

The control of a market by a small number of suppliers of goods or services.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oligopoly - (economics) a market in which control over the supply of a commodity is in the hands of a small number of producers and each one can influence prices and affect competitors
market, marketplace, market place - the world of commercial activity where goods and services are bought and sold; "without competition there would be no market"; "they were driven from the marketplace"
economic science, economics, political economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their management
Translations

oligopoly

[ˌɒlɪˈgɒpəlɪ] Noligopolio m
References in periodicals archive ?
Under these more competitive conditions, the market is more likely to self-regulate, and do so in a more effective manner than through merger conditions imposed on a powerful oligopolist.
President Benigno Aquino III's foolish refusal to allow amendments to the Constitution accelerated this oligopolist shift.
As the largest player in an oligopolist's market, it is enjoying little pressure on its cost base and steady revenue growth, thanks to restricted supply of its product.
The output of oligopolist 1 is [q.sub.1], the output of oligopolist 2 is [q.sub.2], spontaneous demand is a, sensitivity coefficient to price of demand is b.
Any large oligopolist group that controls the market price of a product or service possesses a significant competitive advantage over its smaller rivals.
(1983) showed that in an oligopolist market, homogenous goods, linear demand and constant marginal cost, a merger among identical firms to gain market power is not profitable.
1985) (finding that a competitor plaintiff had standing to sue based on allegations that "it will be 'squeezed' out of the market by the oligopolist firms").
A single excluding oligopolist generally faces some pressure to
He's been branded a micromanager, an egomaniac, a tyrant and an oligopolist. But the one insult that hasn't been flung at Eisner is "failure."
This means that at any stage each firm behaves as a Cournotian oligopolist on residual demand.
In practical terms it may be difficult for any single oligopolist to improve greatly upon his existing relative share of the total market.
For those versed in political economy, it follows a familiar [if ever-alarming) trajectory: privatization couched in the language of efficiency and responsiveness, swiftly made over into a vulgar push for market share; to mergers and monopolies; to escalating costs, declining services and the oligopolist's aversion to new technology.