ridley

(redirected from olive ridleys)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to olive ridleys: Olive Ridley Sea Turtle

rid·ley

 (rĭd′lē)
n. pl. rid·leys

[Originally a local word used by English-speaking fishermen of the Gulf of Mexico, of unknown origin.]

Ridley

(ˈrɪdlɪ)
n
(Biography) Nicholas. ?1500–55, English bishop, who helped to revise the liturgy under Edward VI. He was burnt at the stake for refusing to disavow his Protestant beliefs when Mary I assumed the throne

rid•ley

(ˈrɪd li)

n., pl. -leys.
1. a gray sea turtle, Lepidochelyskempi, of the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of North America.
2. an olive-colored sea turtle, L. olivacea, of the Indian, Pacific, and S Atlantic oceans.
[1940–45; of undetermined orig.]

Rid•ley

(ˈrɪd li)

n.
Nicholas, c1500–55, English bishop, reformer, and martyr.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ridley - a marine turtle
marine turtle, sea turtle - any of various large turtles with limbs modified into flippers; widely distributed in warm seas
Atlantic ridley, bastard ridley, bastard turtle, Lepidochelys kempii - grey sea turtle of the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of North America
Lepidochelys olivacea, olive ridley, Pacific ridley - olive-colored sea turtle of tropical Pacific and Indian and the southern Atlantic oceans
References in periodicals archive ?
According to reports, this is one of the highest death tolls of Olive Ridleys in Vizag district after a span of four years.
The other five--loggerheads, hawksbills, olive ridleys, greens, and leatherbacks--are circumglobal in distribution, with populations of each species found in Earth's three major oceans.
Olive Ridleys feed on crabs, shrimp, fish and small invertebrates as well as jellyfish in shallow waters.
Already a whopping 120,000 Olive Ridleys have succumbed to illegal fishing and coastal development in Orissa over the past decade, ensnared by trawlers and gill-netters that skim the waters during the nesting season.
Wallace Nichols, biologist with the California Academy of Sciences who, in 1998, co-founded Grupo Tortuguero ("Turtle Group") in hopes of recovering the five endangered species of Eastern Pacific Sea Turtles--hawksbills, loggerheads, leatherbacks, olive ridleys, and green turtles--that forage and nest along Baja peninsula.
We saw olive ridleys laying eggs as well as the birth of the hatchlings.
Just south of San Juan del Sur, this natural refuge covers only a mile and a half of beach, yet attracts an extraordinary number of turtles each year, including more than 200,000 Olive Ridleys, one of the world's smallest species.