omission

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o·mis·sion

 (ō-mĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The act or an instance of omitting.
2. The state of having been omitted.
3. Something omitted or neglected.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin omissiō, omissiōn-, from Latin omissus, past participle of omittere, to disregard; see omit.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

omission

(əʊˈmɪʃən) or

omittance

n
1. something that has been omitted or neglected
2. the act of omitting or the state of having been omitted
[C14: from Latin omissiō, from omittere to omit]
oˈmissive adj
oˈmissiveness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

o•mis•sion

(oʊˈmɪʃ ən)

n.
1. the act of omitting.
2. the state of being omitted.
3. something left out, not done, or neglected.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin omissiō < Latin omitt(ere) to let go (see omit)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.omission - a mistake resulting from neglectomission - a mistake resulting from neglect  
failure - an unexpected omission; "he resented my failure to return his call"; "the mechanic's failure to check the brakes"
error, fault, mistake - a wrong action attributable to bad judgment or ignorance or inattention; "he made a bad mistake"; "she was quick to point out my errors"; "I could understand his English in spite of his grammatical faults"
2.omission - something that has been omitted; "she searched the table for omissions"
disuse, neglect - the state of something that has been unused and neglected; "the house was in a terrible state of neglect"
3.omission - any process whereby sounds or words are left out of spoken words or phrases
aphaeresis, apheresis - (linguistics) omission at the beginning of a word as in `coon' for `raccoon' or `till' for `until'
aphesis - the gradual disappearance of an initial (usually unstressed) vowel or syllable as in `squire' for `esquire'
elision - omission of a sound between two words (usually a vowel and the end of one word or the beginning of the next)
eclipsis, ellipsis - omission or suppression of parts of words or sentences
linguistic process - a process involved in human language
4.omission - neglecting to do something; leaving out or passing over something
disregard, neglect - lack of attention and due care
inadvertence, oversight - an unintentional omission resulting from failure to notice something
pretermission - letting pass without notice
exception, elision, exclusion - a deliberate act of omission; "with the exception of the children, everyone was told the news"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

omission

noun
2. gap, space, blank, exclusion, lacuna There is one noticeable omission in your article.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

omission

noun
Nonperformance of what ought to be done:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
حَذْفحَذْف، إغْفال، إسْقاط
udeladelseundladelse
elhagyás
úrfellingúrfelling, òaî aî sleppa úr
vynechanie
izpustitev
atlamaatlanmış/unutulmuş şeyunutma

omission

ʊˈmɪʃən] N (= act of omitting) → omisión f; (= mistake) → descuido m
it was an omission on my partfue un descuido mío
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

omission

ʊˈmɪʃən] nomission f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

omission

n (= omitting: of word, detail etc) → Auslassen nt; (= word, thing etc left out)Auslassung f; (= failure to do sth)Unterlassung f; with the omission of …unter Auslassung (+gen); sin of omission (Eccl, fig) → Unterlassungssünde f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

omission

[əʊˈmɪʃn] nomissione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

omit

(əˈmit) past tense, past participle oˈmitted verb
1. to leave out. You can omit the last chapter of the book.
2. not to do. I omitted to tell him about the meeting.
oˈmission (-ʃən) noun
1. something that has been left out. I have made several omissions in the list of names.
2. the act of omitting. the omission of his name from the list.

omitted and omitting have two ts.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

o·mis·sion

n. omisión; exclusión.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
As writers of travels among barbarous communities are generally very diffuse on these subjects, he deems it right to advert to what may be considered a culpable omission. No one can be more sensible than the author of his deficiencies in this and many other respects; but when the very peculiar circumstances in which he was placed are understood, he feels assured that all these omissions will be excused.
If against the present one any objection be raised on the score of its truth, it can only be that its author was an Arab, as lying is a very common propensity with those of that nation; though, as they are such enemies of ours, it is conceivable that there were omissions rather than additions made in the course of it.
Nevertheless, there are a few omissions which I should be glad to see supplied.
The pure air, and the long summer hours in the open, gave back life and elasticity to Mattie, and Zeena, with more leisure to devote to her complex ailments, grew less watchful of the girl's omissions; so that Ethan, struggling on under the burden of his barren farm and failing saw-mill, could at least imagine that peace reigned in his house.
--By your many small virtues, by your many small omissions, and by your many small submissions!
Specious arguments of danger to the common liberty could easily be contrived; plausible excuses for the deficiencies of the party could, without difficulty, be invented to alarm the apprehensions, inflame the passions, and conciliate the good-will, even of those States which were not chargeable with any violation or omission of duty.
A supply of the omission is one of the lesser instances in which the convention have improved on the model before them.
The omission of this was highly blameable in one Mr Moore, who, having formerly borrowed some lines of Pope and company, took the liberty to transcribe six of them into his play of the Rival Modes.
Thus they denote the folly of a servant, an omission of a child, a stone that cuts their feet, a continuance of foul or unseasonable weather, and the like, by adding to each the epithet of YAHOO.
If you haven't read his book your education has been shamefully neglected, and you must repair the omission at once.
Mrs Tapkins likewise discovers her omission, and with promptitude repairs it; for herself; for Miss Tapkins, for Miss Frederica Tapkins, for Miss Antonina Tapkins, for Miss Malvina Tapkins, and for Miss Euphemia Tapkins.
A Dodson would not be taxed with the omission of anything that was becoming, or that belonged to that eternal fitness of things which was plainly indicated in the practice of the most substantial parishioners, and in the family traditions,--such as obedience to parents, faithfulness to kindred, industry, rigid honesty, thrift, the thorough scouring of wooden and copper utensils, the hoarding of coins likely to disappear from the currency, the production of first-rate commodities for the market, and the general preference of whatever was home-made.