omission

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o·mis·sion

 (ō-mĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The act or an instance of omitting.
2. The state of having been omitted.
3. Something omitted or neglected.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin omissiō, omissiōn-, from Latin omissus, past participle of omittere, to disregard; see omit.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

omission

(əʊˈmɪʃən) or

omittance

n
1. something that has been omitted or neglected
2. the act of omitting or the state of having been omitted
[C14: from Latin omissiō, from omittere to omit]
oˈmissive adj
oˈmissiveness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

o•mis•sion

(oʊˈmɪʃ ən)

n.
1. the act of omitting.
2. the state of being omitted.
3. something left out, not done, or neglected.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin omissiō < Latin omitt(ere) to let go (see omit)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.omission - a mistake resulting from neglectomission - a mistake resulting from neglect  
failure - an unexpected omission; "he resented my failure to return his call"; "the mechanic's failure to check the brakes"
error, fault, mistake - a wrong action attributable to bad judgment or ignorance or inattention; "he made a bad mistake"; "she was quick to point out my errors"; "I could understand his English in spite of his grammatical faults"
2.omission - something that has been omitted; "she searched the table for omissions"
disuse, neglect - the state of something that has been unused and neglected; "the house was in a terrible state of neglect"
3.omission - any process whereby sounds or words are left out of spoken words or phrases
aphaeresis, apheresis - (linguistics) omission at the beginning of a word as in `coon' for `raccoon' or `till' for `until'
aphesis - the gradual disappearance of an initial (usually unstressed) vowel or syllable as in `squire' for `esquire'
elision - omission of a sound between two words (usually a vowel and the end of one word or the beginning of the next)
eclipsis, ellipsis - omission or suppression of parts of words or sentences
linguistic process - a process involved in human language
4.omission - neglecting to do something; leaving out or passing over something
disregard, neglect - lack of attention and due care
inadvertence, oversight - an unintentional omission resulting from failure to notice something
pretermission - letting pass without notice
exception, elision, exclusion - a deliberate act of omission; "with the exception of the children, everyone was told the news"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

omission

noun
2. gap, space, blank, exclusion, lacuna There is one noticeable omission in your article.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

omission

noun
Nonperformance of what ought to be done:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
حَذْفحَذْف، إغْفال، إسْقاط
udeladelseundladelse
elhagyás
úrfellingúrfelling, òaî aî sleppa úr
vynechanie
izpustitev
atlamaatlanmış/unutulmuş şeyunutma

omission

ʊˈmɪʃən] N (= act of omitting) → omisión f; (= mistake) → descuido m
it was an omission on my partfue un descuido mío
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

omission

ʊˈmɪʃən] nomission f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

omission

n (= omitting: of word, detail etc) → Auslassen nt; (= word, thing etc left out)Auslassung f; (= failure to do sth)Unterlassung f; with the omission of …unter Auslassung (+gen); sin of omission (Eccl, fig) → Unterlassungssünde f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

omission

[əʊˈmɪʃn] nomissione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

omit

(əˈmit) past tense, past participle oˈmitted verb
1. to leave out. You can omit the last chapter of the book.
2. not to do. I omitted to tell him about the meeting.
oˈmission (-ʃən) noun
1. something that has been left out. I have made several omissions in the list of names.
2. the act of omitting. the omission of his name from the list.

omitted and omitting have two ts.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

o·mis·sion

n. omisión; exclusión.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Kevin Smitham's ommision from the online family album did not go unnoticed.
Political manipulation dates back over a hundred years, and many tactics have been developed, such as deliberate ommision of details and repetition of a false statement until people eventually believe it [1].
Recalling the steadfastness and principled positions of late Justice Mustapha Akanbi, the pioneer Chairman of the Independent Corrupt Practices and Other Related Offences Ommision ( ICPC) and human rights lawyer, Gani Fawehinmi on reforming judiciary and fighting corruption, Comrade Aremu wondered what would be the reactions of the late luminaries to the current developments in the judiciary sector.
In addition, since GMI uses essentially the same criteria to measure all firms, governance scores of firms in countries with low disclosure of corporate governance practices may be unduly penalized by their ommision of data rather than their actual practices.
In what many saw as a glaring ommision when the scheme was announced, Redcar, Stockton and Billingham were all missed in the handout to 57 councils, which will receive more than pounds 52,000 apiece to reinvigorate dismal retail areas.
(124) "Instead, Congress passed a law that continued the pre-Clinton (1981) policy of excluding homosexuals from the military." (125) Donnelly repeats this claim in several different ways, saying that "there is no way that bipartisan, veto-proof majorities would have passed a law making it 'easier' for homosexuals to serve." (126) She claims that Congress adopted "unambiguous statements" banning homosexuals from military service, (127) but that the Clinton administration "disregard[ed] the legal mandate" of the statute (128) and that to describe the policy as "don't ask, don't tell" "effectively slanders the statute." (129) The only concession made by Congress to the spirit of the Clinton proposal, she writes, "was ommision [sic] of 'the question' about homosexuality" at accession.
Bale's ommision prompted speculation the club did not want to affect his value by him becoming cup-tied, although Burley maintained the Welsh international was resting a hamstring strain.
He has totally devalued, by ommision in the poem, any reference to his literary gifts (which ironically, ultimately accorded him immortality).
James's ommision left Croft as his stand-in, and the off-spinner lost the toss with opposite number Mike Powell putting Glamorgan in.
But Thomas' ommision from the first team Welsh squad has left John perplexed.
With respect to lists of this sort, errors of ommision constitute a greater source of bias than do errors of commission, according to F.
person of the possible ommision. Example 2 - Machine-Parent, Person-Child