omnicompetent

(redirected from omnicompetence)
Related to omnicompetence: unmaintained

omnicompetent

(ˌɒmnɪˈkɒmpɪtənt)
adj
able to judge or deal with all matters
ˌomniˈcompetence n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
I speak some English.' He did not need to emphasise his omnicompetence, indeed, that would have counted as suspicious bad form: his accent declared it.
For that reason, people must confront the ethical multidimensionality of the world by committing to a cause and devoting themselves to a specialized vocation in the place of former Faustian omnicompetence (Bastin, 2013: 11).
1009, 1028-29 (1990) ("There is considerably more doubt [about student editors' competence] when experts in other disciplines, or law professors with extra backgrounds in economics, psychology, or philosophy, submit articles dealing with the law."); Cramton, supra note 7, at 7 ("[T]his myth of [student editors'] omnicompetence clearly has no validity today....
I propose the term "omnicompetence" as a way of distinguishing this latter type of omniscience.
"The temptation is to make some single form of the mind seem omnicompetent; omnicompetence becomes omniscience and asserts for itself closed authority based upon a final revelation" (171).
The delusion of omnicompetence was more believable when knowledge was based on paper and could be contained within the covers of a book.
The limit of this meta-desire I call omnicompetence, the ability to satisfy all desires.
To charge courts with the task of accommodating the incommensurable factors of policy that underlie these mathematical puzzles is to attribute, however flatteringly, omnicompetence to judges.
Roepke was appalled by the sheer vastness of the modern state, its absurd omnicompetence, its unerring ability to do badly what it shouldn't be doing at all.
In a language that is unmistakably his, Cragg touched upon this issue with his innovative alternative to omnipotence: "God's is an omnicompetence which has made room within itself for a caliphate of ours." (52) It could well be highly illuminating and personally healing to be involved in such a common search for answers to what it means that God leaves room for an "over-against God" in human actions and in nature's seeming capriciousness, and it could well help many Muslims and Christians to recognize distinctively different perspectives within their own traditions and between them.