omnicompetent

omnicompetent

(ˌɒmnɪˈkɒmpɪtənt)
adj
able to judge or deal with all matters
ˌomniˈcompetence n
References in periodicals archive ?
Polkinghorne argues that we are confronted today with a vociferous fundamentalism which manifests itself in either a totally omnicompetent science or an infallibly omniscient religion.
He said the council was looking for an "omnicompetent warden" and that it works elsewhere.
Archival documents reveal an omnicompetent ruler directly, and conscientiously, engaged in the management of all aspects of government: In short, he, not Henry VII, was England's first "bureaucrat-king" (76).
"We have on the one hand a desperate need; hunger, sickness, and the dread of war," Lewis noted, and "we have, on the other, the conception of something that might meet it: omnicompetent global technocracy."
Chapter eleven regards cybernetics as omnicompetent, if not omniscient and omnipotent: "ultimately" it could "show us how to govern the evolution of life and the universe," including fully conscious AI (pp.
The Victorian sage achieves this aim chiefly by functioning as a master interpreter, an omnicompetent understanding eye that can successfully read a world full of "mysteriously encoded" signs illegible to others (Landow, Elegant 45).
Theocracy or an aggressive version of an established religion has its defects, but these are not remedied by dogmatic versions of religious unbelief or an omnicompetent laicist state--which excludes religion entirely.
As Tushnet would understand "dual sovereignty" or Two Kingdoms, religion is omnicompetent in its field and government is omnicompetent in its field, and again, "never the twain shall meet." What Tushnet fails to realize is that in classical Two Kingdoms theory, the ruler was a Christian who bore the mantle of government wisely, justly, and out of a desire to mutually benefit the church and the state.
They may sue state instrumentalities (179) and, by bringing lawsuits against private parties, increasingly function as an omnicompetent regulatory agency.
2011) (Posner, J., dissenting from denial of rehearing en banc) ("A few judges may think that Congress is omnicompetent; more pretend to think that--what they really think being that literal interpretation of statutes is necessary to save the nation from judicial tyranny." (emphasis omitted)).