omniscient

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om·nis·cient

 (ŏm-nĭsh′ənt)
adj.
Having total knowledge; knowing everything: an omniscient deity; the omniscient narrator.
n.
1. One having total knowledge.
2. Omniscient God. Used with the.

[Medieval Latin omnisciēns, omniscient- : Latin omni-, omni- + Latin sciēns, scient-, present participle of scīre, to know; see skei- in Indo-European roots.]

om·nis′cience, om·nis′cien·cy n.
om·nis′cient·ly adv.

omniscient

(ɒmˈnɪsɪənt)
adj
1. having infinite knowledge or understanding
2. having very great or seemingly unlimited knowledge
[C17: from Medieval Latin omnisciens, from Latin omni- + scīre to know]
omˈniscience n
omˈnisciently adv

om•nis•cient

(ɒmˈnɪʃ ənt)

adj.
1. having complete or unlimited knowledge, awareness, or understanding.
n.
2. an omniscient being.
3. the Omniscient, God.
om•nis′cient•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.omniscient - infinitely wiseomniscient - infinitely wise      
wise - having or prompted by wisdom or discernment; "a wise leader"; "a wise and perceptive comment"

omniscient

adjective all-knowing, all-seeing, all-wise He believes in a benevolent and omniscient deity.
Translations
allwissendomniszient
kaikkitietävä
allvetande

omniscient

[ɒmˈnɪsɪənt] ADJomnisciente

omniscient

[ɒmˈnɪsɪənt] adjomniscient(e)

omniscient

adjallwissend

omniscient

[ɒmˈnɪsɪənt] adjonnisciente
References in classic literature ?
Let us leave this God of Pointland to the ignorant fruition of his omnipresence and omniscience: nothing that you or I can do can rescue him from his self-satisfaction."
"I, whom you behold in these black garments of the priesthood -- I, who ascend the sacred desk, and turn my pale face heavenward, taking upon myself to hold communion in your behalf with the Most High Omniscience -- I, in whose daily life you discern the sanctity of Enoch -- I, whose footsteps, as you suppose, leave a gleam along my earthly track, whereby the Pilgrims that shall come after me may be guided to the regions of the blest -- I, who have laid the hand of baptism upon your children -- I, who have breathed the parting prayer over your dying friends, to whom the Amen sounded faintly from a world which they had quitted -- I, your pastor, whom you so reverence and trust, am utterly a pollution and a lie!"
This excellent method of conveying a falsehood with the heart only, without making the tongue guilty of an untruth, by the means of equivocation and imposture, hath quieted the conscience of many a notable deceiver; and yet, when we consider that it is Omniscience on which these endeavour to impose, it may possibly seem capable of affording only a very superficial comfort; and that this artful and refined distinction between communicating a lie, and telling one, is hardly worth the pains it costs them.