omohyoid


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Related to omohyoid: thyrohyoid

omohyoid

(ˌəʊməˈhaɪɔɪd)
n
(Anatomy) anatomy a muscle found in the shoulder
References in periodicals archive ?
Two additional muscles indirectly lower it: the sternohyoid (sternum to hyoid bone) and the omohyoid (scapula to hyoid bone).
NMIHF has a composite structure that is vascularized by the superior thyroid artery and vein pedicle, is innervated by the deep branches of ansa cervicalis, and includes the upper parts of the sternohyoid, sternothyroid and omohyoid muscles (7, 8).
The defect was repaired with DuraSeal followed by rotation of the right omohyoid muscle into the site of the defect between the prevertebral fascia and the oropharyngeal mucosa.
After a year of study, Smith realized the woodpecker activates the omohyoid muscle in its head upon impact to apply slight pressure on the jugular, which slightly increases blood volume in the brain, creating a sort of cushion.
The sternohyoid, thyrohyoid, and omohyoid muscles are divided along the inferior border of the hyoid bone and reflected downward, while the external thyroid perichondrium is incised along the superior border from the base of the cornu to the thyroid notch, and an inferiorly based thyroid perichondrial flap is created and dissected, exposing the superior half of the lamina (figure 2).
At the root of the neck, the thoracic duct is bordered anteriorly by the left common carotid artery, Vagus nerve, and IJV, medially by the esophagus, laterally by the omohyoid muscle, and posteriorly by the vertebra.
An incision was made in the neck at the midline, and the left common carotid artery was exposed between the sternocleidomastoid and omohyoid muscles.
AS: anterior scalene, EJV: external jugular vein, MS: middle scalene, OMH: omohyoid, SA: serratus anterior, SCA: subclavian artery, SCBP: supraclavicular brachial plexus, SCN: supraclavicular nerve, TCA: transverse cervical artery, and UT: upper trapezius.
Omohyoid muscle syndrome (OMS), also called omohyoid sling syndrome, is a rare disease.
The fre-quency with which the SSL ossies relates to the bro-cartilaginous character of the ligament.4 The anatomi-cal knowledge of suprascapular foramen is of extreme importance for clinicians; it can be a risk factor during surgical explorations involving a suprascapular nerve decompression.5 The coexistence of the suprascapular notch and the suprascapular foramen is another ana-tomical variation in the suprascapular region.6 The presence of an ossified STSL may also pose a challenge during decompression of the suprascapular notch if the condition is not fully appreciated.7 The ossification of the STSL may also alter the attachment of the omohyoid muscle which has its attachment clo-se to it.
The saved time in HS group was not only related to reducing the conventional hand-tie ligation but also to the ease and speed of dissection, especially in the dissection of upper cervical flap (Figure 2), in the II-III level under the sternocleidomastoid muscle along the plane of the internal jugular vein and in the IV-V level when it is needed to cut the fibrofatty tissue and/or the muscles (sternocleidomastoid and omohyoid) (Figures 3 and 4).