Omphale


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Omphale

(ˈɒmfəˌliː)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a queen of Lydia, whom Hercules was required to serve as a slave to atone for the murder of Iphitus
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
"Ah, you do well to ask," said Eugenie, laughing; "I forgot that I was Hercules, and you only the pale Omphale!" And the young girl, kneeling on the top, pressed the two parts of the portmanteau together, and Mademoiselle d'Armilly passed the bolt of the padlock through.
and don't we see every day in the world many an honest Hercules at the apron-strings of Omphale, and great whiskered Samsons prostrate in Delilah's lap?
In Paris in 2005, Brodie took the plunge and bought a plate decorated with a scene depicting Hercules and Omphale. It's a composition that pays more than a passing nod to Raphael and was painted, at least in part, by the Raphael of maiolica painting, Nicola da Urbino, around 1528-35.
As Heather James notes, like Aeneas in Dido's rich Carthaginian attire, Hercules unmanned by Omphale, Antony embodies 'the Augustan view of himself as the Roman hero emasculated by a foreign enchantress'.
Omphale regina Lydorum fuit facie adeo praestanti ut ei sese submiserit Hercules.
22-23) recalls Hercules's similar humiliation at the hands of Queen Omphale, as told by Herodotus and Didorus Siculus--both of whom claimed possible Egyptian origins for "the seemingly most Greek, and later Roman, of heroes" (Archer 13; see Archer 12-18).
"Omphale: La Tapisserie amoureuse, historie rococo" (1834) by the same author is another interesting case that gives a further illustration of the fantastic threshold within the city.
The primary stories discussed are "Le pied de momie" and "Omphale."
(56.) Omphale in The Brazen Age is crushed by rocks, and the Empress in Alphonsus Emperor of Germany dragged by the hair (along with many others).
1.7.4 which describes the Heraclidae--that is, the Tylonids--as descended from Heracles and an unnamed slave, possibly not Omphale; Soph.
Sophocles keeps at the margins of his play the sojourn of Herakles in Lydia, as a cross-dressing slave of the 'barbarian' Queen, Omphale of the interesting name, but its theme of sexual passion and confusion (WT 70-2, 248-54, 432-3; see Apollodorus and Lucian "Dialogs of the gods") flows into the mainstream of the action that begins with the surging tri-form Achelous, carries into the persistent surging of the Hydra's venom, of the centaur's lust and hatred and the substantively similar desires of Herakles, Dejanira and Iole all goaded by Aphrodite.
La courtisane Clarimonde, la Princesse Hermontis, la peinture Omphale, mortes depuis longtemps deja, 'traversent la frontiere' de la mort a la vie.