on-base percentage


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on-base percentage

(ŏn′bās′, ôn′-)
n. Baseball
A batter's number of times of reaching base safely, excluding instances resulting from a fielder's choice or an error, divided by the total number of times batting minus sacrifices, expressed as a three-digit decimal and used as a measure of a batter's overall effectiveness.
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References in periodicals archive ?
407 on-base percentage in 288 career minor league games.
Since 1900, the lowest batting average for a player who led his league in on-base percentage is .
He also finished second in runs (75) and hits (127), and was fourth in on-base percentage (.
Others will argue that focusing on on-base percentage is also too simplistic, that a more sophisticated array of statistics is necessary to truly rank the best performance by hitters in a given year.
Bill Beane, built a major league team around the philosophy of what he considers the most important offensive statistic in the game: on-base percentage.
Baseball aficionados can routinely rank players by their batting average, on-base percentage and slugging percentage, to mention only a few.
As the A's cruised to another first place finish this year, an odd thing happened: they did it with pitching and fleet-footed defense, not their on-base percentage (which ranked near the bottom of the American League).
Last season, Derek Jeter led the majors with 216 hits and had an on-base percentage of .
Statistical analysis to measure player performance has become so sophisticated over the last quarter century that traditional tools like batting average and earned run average have been augmented and in some cases even replaced by more encompassing measurements like on-base percentage, which became an official statistic in 1984, and the more revolutionary OPS--a term that combines a player's on-base percentage and slugging percentage.