oncer

oncer

(ˈwʌnsə)
n
1. Brit (formerly) a one-pound note
2. Austral a person elected to Parliament who can only expect to serve one term
3. NZ something that happens on only one occasion
[C20: from once]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the key distinction concerning relative individual versus group orientation remains (Oncer 2013).
I am absolutely blown away by the passion and commitment of the Oncer fans.
Organizational trust has been studied in sociology, psychology, and management (Yildiz & Oncer, 2012) and has a great significance in organizational behavior.
However, the operational mechanisms of foreseeing and preventing crises may be insufficient (Ataman, 2002; Oncer, 2000; Simsek, 1999).
There are many annual conferences and symposia, with the resulting output of articles (Desaa (2006); Smith, Barr, Barbosa and Kickul, (2008); Oncer and Yildiz (2010).
The Ford Foundation had made it clear that the grant was a 'oncer', but it required that a progress report should be given to the foundation in mid-term.
He was joined by shadow Defence Secretary Andrew Murrison, who served as a medical oNcer in the Royal Navy for 18 years.
In parliamentary terms, his prime-ministership was that of a "oncer".
Labour then offered a 100 [pounds sterling] rebate for the 1958 year, a oncer. In this campaign National increased their concession to be for the three-year term of the next Parliament.
sheep in bunuel / are women in hats, oncers, passionate
Words like notes, ackers, pelf, readies, smackers (or smackeroonies, the more extravagant word that I particularly remember), bills, oncers, and so many more spring to mind.