oncogene


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on·co·gene

 (ŏn′kə-jēn, ŏng′-)
n.
1. Any of various mutated genes that cause the transformation of normal cells into cancerous cells.
2. Any of various viral genes that transform host cells into cancerous cells.

[Greek onkos, mass, tumor; see oncology + gene.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

oncogene

(ˈɒŋkəʊˌdʒiːn)
n
(Genetics) any of several genes, first identified in viruses but present in all cells, that when abnormally activated can cause cancer
[C20 from Gk onkos mass, tumour + gene]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

on•co•gene

(ˈɒŋ kəˌdʒin)

n.
any gene that is a causative factor in the initiation of cancerous growth.
[1965–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

on·co·gene

(ŏn′kə-jēn)
A gene containing a mutation in its DNA that causes normal cells to turn into cancerous ones. See Note at cancer.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oncogene - a gene that disposes normal cells to change into cancerous tumor cellsoncogene - a gene that disposes normal cells to change into cancerous tumor cells
cistron, gene, factor - (genetics) a segment of DNA that is involved in producing a polypeptide chain; it can include regions preceding and following the coding DNA as well as introns between the exons; it is considered a unit of heredity; "genes were formerly called factors"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The sophisticated oncogene laboratory, which is part of the ambitious Yacoub Behbehani Laboratory Building and Bone Marrow Transplantation Center, is expected to make a great difference in discovering and treating advanced and complicated types of cancer, ministry spokesman Dr.
Guilty as charged: B-RAF is a human oncogene. Cancer Cell 2004;6(4):313-9.
Overexpression of FTH1P3 promoted proliferation and colony formation in OSCC cells and the upregulation of FZD5 (frizzled class receptor 5), target of miR-224-5p and an oncogene involved in activation of Wnt/[beta]-catenin signaling.
In these cells, while stem cell potential is maintained, the oncogenic protein responsible for disease is lost ("oncogene suppression") [33, 34].
The pace of progress in battling cancers has steadily accelerated, and a relatively new tool--the oncogene panel--is beginning to prove its value.
TEHRAN (FNA)- In a study involving the fruit fly equivalent of an oncogene implicated in many human leukemias, a research team has gained insight into how developing cells normally switch to a restricted, or specialized, state and how that process might go wrong in cancer.
About 10% of lung cancer patients have mutations in the EGFR oncogene. For those patients in particular, this finding could have significant impact in developing a personalized, targeted therapy.
66 MICRORNA-29 NEGATIVELY REGULATES EXPRESSION OF ONCOGENE TET2
* Self sufficiency of growth signals: Tumors have capacity to proliferate without external stimuli, as a consequence of oncogene activation.
Thus, silencing GRP78 oncogene expression via the RNAi pathway may lead to cancer cell death.
The key features of developing gastric cancer are hyperproliferation and oncogene expression of gastric epithelial cells.