oncomouse


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oncomouse

(ˈɒŋkəʊˌmaʊs)
n, pl -mice
(Medicine) US a mouse bred for cancer treatment research
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

oncomouse

n (Med) Maus mit eingepflanztem Krebsgen, → Onkomaus f, → Krebsmaus f; oncomouse patentKrebsmauspatent nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Enquanto que o trabalho de Haraway esta repleto de figuras inspiradoras como o ciborgue, o primata, o coiote trapaceiro, o OncoMouse e o canino, todos reconceituando a agencia em termos mais-que-humanos, o trabalho de Barad apresenta uma reconceituacao mais abstrata da agencia material advinda da fisica.
Case in point was the difficulties in cancer research being encountered due to the so-called "DuPont Oncomouse Patents" originating from Harvard University.
(151) In 1984 the Court expanded the holding of Chakrabarty to multicellular organisms when it granted a patent to Harvard University on their genetically engineered "oncomouse" (152) The Patent and Trademark Office acknowledged, "[that] it now considered 'nonnaturally occurring non-human multicellular living organisms, including animals, to be patentable subject matter within the scope' of 35 U.S.C.
There have been " rivalries for power and information," which find expression in the burying of competing theories and therapies, the ignoring of disfavored hypotheses, sharp competition treating research as a race between contenders, and a desire for exclusivity such as when the OncoMouse in 1988 became "the first animal patented in history." Necessarily in so complex an effort, there have been intellectual divides, leading to "interminable institutional scuffles" and "bitterly opposed camps."
In the West, humans have long been defined in opposition to animals, but these categories have been effaced, Haraway observes, through the figure of the oncomouse (a transgenic mouse in which a human oncogene was transplanted).
(86.) Fiona Murray, The Oncomouse that Roared: Hybrid Exchange Strategies as a Source of Distinction at the Boundary of Overlapping Institutions, 116 AM.
It is here that a different interaction between the human and the animal occurs in which the boundaries are blurred in distinctly problematic ways that have been explored by Donna Haraway, for example, in her portrayal of Oncomouse. (14) In a more concrete but no less sophisticated way, this revolution of the code, has, nonetheless, also impacted upon our equine protagonist in terms of genetic industrialisation, especially through extra uterine breeding techniques and cloning to ensure the continued 'bloodlines' of highly prized and priced specialists in racing and equestrianism, for example.