one-acter

one-acter

n
(Theatre) informal a one-act play
Translations

one-acter

, one-act play
nEinakter m
References in periodicals archive ?
In its almost mystical balance, this forty-minute one-acter gives off the impression of a pure human testimony braided by an unassuming belief in God and love of one's fellow humans.
Yet there was no need to worry over this one-acter (directed expertly by Ellie Jones) since the evening flew by.
The second play, Krapp's Last Tape -- a one-acter of approximately 40 minutes, in which Paul plays Krapp, the titular and only character -- continues the Beckett themes.
Here are some questionable renditions from Emelise Aleandri's otherwise quite smart translation of the one-acter Shhhh by Etta Cascini: "con tono cupo" / "profoundly," and "fuma nervosamente" / ".
The one-acter was first staged with choreography by Leonide Massine for Serge Diaghilev's Ballets Russe in 1920 and has passed through many choreographic hands since then.
Neither the Condit nor the Levy character appears directly in this short and snappy one-acter, receiving its regional bow after an Off Broadway run last year at playwrights' collective 13P.
(Unfortunately, since the Ensemble Studio premiere Williams's play has not received any scholarly attention.) Theatre critic Glenne Currie quarreled with Williams for writing "a lightweight work,"(7) while Mel Gussow labeled the one-acter "a slight slapstick comedy about two inept elderly persons on an ocean liner."(8) More generously, perhaps, Carol Lannone found that Lifeboat has "an hilariously vaudevillish quality of senile slapstick" ("Three New Pieces") and Terry Curtis Fox perceptively admitted it was "quite amusing while revealing a real panic about the onset of old age."(9) Yet for Douglas Watt the one-acter was "a very unfunny comedy" (p.
Typical of these early selections is Next, a one-acter about a "fat man in his late forties" who is mistakenly asked to report to a military infirmary for his preinduction physical.
a comic one-acter which usually receives little attention, points up seemingly obvious, and hitherto ignored, phallic imagery.
But here is the University of British Columbia Opera Ensemble in its presentation in May 2015 of a comic one-acter in UBC's Old Auditorium.
In the list of the many sensational opera performances staged at Symphony Hall over nearly a quarter of a century, this Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra presentation of Richard Strauss' powerful one-acter Salome is an immediate stand-out.
"Stairway to Heaven" is just the kind of adventuresome work Intersection has long been identified with, even if this one-acter about five misfits in the hard-luck Tenderloin district, ends up feeling as unfocused as it is frequently vivid.