onomasiology


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onomasiology

(ˌɒnəʊˌmeɪsɪˈɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Linguistics) another name for onomastics1
2. (Linguistics) the branch of semantics concerned with the meanings of and meaning relations between individual words

onomasiology

onomastics. — onomasiologist, n. — onomasiologic, onomasiological, adj.
See also: Linguistics
Translations
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References in periodicals archive ?
(109) Joachim Grzega & Marion Schoner, English and General Historical Lexicology: Materials for Onomasiology Seminars, 1 Onomasiology Online Monographs 1, 32 (2007).
Borrowing as a word-finding process in cognitive historical onomasiology. Onomasiology Online 4: 22-42.
Consequently, as far as a long historical period is concerned, the variation of lexis is a complicated issue, which is not only fundamental to historical lexicology but also related to many research fields ranging from historical linguistics [3], onomasiology, etymology, to sociolinguistics [4].
Neither semasiology nor onomasiology seem to provide conclusive answers, for the profile of JUST is largely alike in all languages and the terms that have diachronically interacted with JUST not include the notions that outstrip English from other languages.
Through a combination of historical onomasiology and cognitive linguistics, my research will propose an analysis and description both of OE expressions literally meaning FEAR and expressions that do not literally refer to this concept (that is, metonyms and metaphors, both living and dead).
In an open, or yet incompletely browsed domain (such as Web pages might induce), onomasiology is less capable.
Elizabeth Closs Traugott affirme a ce sujet: "Ultimately of course, semasiology presupposes onomasiology, and onomasiology presupposes semasiology, since domains have members, and over times individual form-meaning pairs come to be used to express those domains [...]" (3).
Eight of the papers are in the area of onomasiology (the branch of linguistics concerned with the question "how do you express X?") and the remaining contributions are in the area of semasiology (concerned with the question "what does the word X mean?").
(87.) Semasiology, or lexical semantics, was a branch of lexicology, distinct from onomasiology.
Diachronic onomasiology and semantic reconstruction.