onomastically

onomastically

(ˌɒnəˈmæstɪkəlɪ)
adv
(Linguistics) from an onomastic point of view
References in periodicals archive ?
Onomastically and cratylically, it is clear from the outset that Joseph is to be recognized as the "good guy" given his valiant surname "Valeureux," a categorization furthered by the narrative agent's description of him as nothing "short" of a saint: "Comme tous les geants, Joseph Valeureux etait un de ces etres doux et bienveillants dont on dirait que leur altitude empeche de voir le mal" (39).
(31.) Robinson did not exhaust how the narrative was shaped onomastically; see 207-12.
As Harbaksh Makijani revealed he and his cohort were embarrassed by their Hindu names in their youth.46 Yet as the experience of Alya Oad above testifies Pakistani society seems to have become more intolerant since then as the quest for not being onomastically marked can lead a person from the Hindu community of Pakistan in serious trouble nowadays.
Were we living in an onomastically ideal world, we would expect to find, in the U.S.,
Onomastically, the attachments to and of the Swanns who swim on water are resisted by the subterranean, crustacean movement of the letters, the underwater slippage of a sideways movement that is both somatic and linguistic, the slippage of the signifier taking the place, as it were, of the body.
Onomastically suggesting an ironic kinship with Poland's patron saint, Stanley feels empowered in any contest over territory whether it concerns Belle Reve or where he thinks his cronies should bowl.
Who, exactly, is this Rob, With the, onomastically, interesting name?
(26) The point seems to be that sister Agneta turns up as a reminiscence of Oskar's mother, both onomastically and behaviorally (since she starts eating fish after she gets out of the bunker).
In each case, however, Feste is onomastically his performative type.
Haywood revealingly suggests that "Roxana" was synonymous in midcentury with a disingenuous, demanding mistress or a recalcitrant wife, and we are reminded of the onomastically similar Mlle.
We have so little preserved from the Paleobalkanic languages that some of these words could be of Phrygian or Ancient Macedonian origin or from languages almost not attested at all, like Paeonian or mostly onomastically attested languages like Illyrian, or maybe even shared by several of these languages.
Both French and foreign figures from the Renaissance to the nineteenth century commingle onomastically there in seeming celebration of a national legacy of creativity and universal artistic appreciation.