onomastics


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Related to onomastics: Onomastician

on·o·mas·tics

 (ŏn′ə-măs′tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
1.
a. The study of the origins and forms of proper names.
b. The study of the origins and forms of terms used in specialized fields.
2. The system that underlies the formation and use of proper names or terms used in specialized fields.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

onomastics

(ˌɒnəˈmæstɪks)
n
1. (Linguistics) (functioning as singular) the study of proper names, esp of their origins
2. (Linguistics) (functioning as singular or plural) a systematization of the facts about how proper names are formed in a given language
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

on•o•mas•tics

(ˌɒn əˈmæs tɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the study of the origin, history, and use of proper names.
[1930–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

onomastics

onomatology. — onomastician, n. — onomastic, adj.
See also: Names
the study of names and their origins. — onomastic, adj. — onomastician, n.
See also: Linguistics
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

onomastics

The study of the history, forms, and origins of proper nouns.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.onomastics - the branch of lexicology that studies the forms and origins of proper names
lexicology - the branch of linguistics that studies the lexical component of language
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

onomastics

[ˌɒnəʊˈmæstɪks] NSINGonomástica f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The last chapters conduct us with modesty and authority into the worlds of archaeology, onomastics, and (mythical) topography.
It then proceeds through phonology (five pages), morphology (forty pages) and syntax (eight pages), and concludes with comments on vocabulary and onomastics and on three characteristics of Ugaritic poetic language.
The main objection is that the scribe would either have to have known the Iranian language to some extent, which is not very likely, or have been a specialist in onomastics, which again is not credible.
These are not so much a problem for the study of onomastics as is another small body of names that seem Semitic or even Hebrew and for which an etymology can be proposed, but that are not transparent.
The volume next turns to more synthetic essays in the area of economy, society, onomastics, iconography, religion, and political history.
Rutgers enters the minefield of onomastics with a sure step and shows that, in fact, no discernible patterns can be found regarding the popularity of Latin, Greek, and Semitic names.
But, the aphaeresis of l < l is so rare in South-Arabian onomastics (but normal in North-Arabian) that it cannot be invoked unless as a last resort.
While the medieval Muslims themselves discussed quite consciously and extensively their onomastic systems, and while much modem European scholarship (like the fundamental work of Caetani and Gabrieli) has both surveyed and deepened the traditional understanding of Islamic onomastics, little of this material is in English.
The introduction gives basic information about language, onomastics, paleography, iconography (and the Deir Alla Plaster texts, which are not included in this corpus).
Mr Ogot argues that the Luo baptismal language of the world is exclusive scholastic basis for universal study of onomastics (study of the history and origin of proper names, especially personal names) and philosophy owing to its special capacity to decode meanings of all proper nouns and names comprehensively.
Estonian onomastics has only used the term siirdnimi 'transferred name' for the names, especially place names, which have been taken along away from their original locations, mostly due to migration (see, e.g., Kallasmaa 1996; Pall 1977; for more specifics about name transfer in Estonian toponymy, see Laansalu 2018).
Writing in the journal Onomastics in Contemporary Public Space, Ephraim Nissan and Mario Alinei, perhaps hoping to redeem the Jewish antiquity of the doughy disc, pointed to the pizzarelle, possibly a cookie-sized version of pizza eagerly consumed by Jewish children in ancient Rome.