ontological argument


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ontological argument

n
1. (Philosophy) the traditional a priori argument for the existence of God on the grounds that the concept itself necessitates existence. Compare cosmological argument, teleological argument
2. any analogous argument from the nature of some concept to the existence of whatever instantiates it
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The so-called ontological argument has a complex and controverted history, rising to particular prominence in contemporary analytic philosophy.
His topics are intellectual expulsion, historical forms of mysticism, the path of demystification, a letter from Rene Girard, transition: corrections and paradoxes, Girard's ontological argument for the existence of God, mimetic theory's post-Kantian legacy, mimetic theory and hermeneutic communism, the self in crisis, and hermeneutic mimetic theory.
This is due to Kant's refutation of the ontological argument. For Descartes, the existence of the extended substance, together with its mathematizable qualities, depends on his demonstration of the existence of God.
Interestingly, Albert Camus once said: "I have never seen anyone die for the ontological argument." People cannot, for instance, ruin the value of the things one has worked hard for because of ambition.
While I affirm the significance and appropriateness of this recent revisionist literature, my intent here is to resituate Proslogion--and the "ontological argument" (3) in particular--in a history of reception in Latin trinitarian theology stretching from Augustine to Bonaventure, and to draw out a few of the metaphysical issues involved in that history.
By now we can see how Hegelian ontological argument fits to explain the dual relationship between the Taliban and Pakistan Army and the state.
Their entire project seems to depend in some fairly basic sense on the defensibility of some version of the ontological argument for the existence of God.
His basic ontological argument is that Nature should be kept as a realist concept concerning otherness that is distinct from culture.
Both arguments seek "a cause of the world's being a cosmos" but the ontological argument emphasizes "on order, design, and the adaptation of means to ends.
With regard to the specific philosophical hypothesis put forward by Kishik, his ontological argument constantly presupposes a meta-level, that of "the power of life itself, which can be seen as an inverted biopolitics" (35).
At this point I think a critical discussion of Descartes' view on the ontological argument can contribute, on the one hand, to a better understanding of Collingwood's denial--via his implicit rejection of the validity of the Cartesian type of argument started from Dubito--of the possibility of demonstrating basic beliefs and, on the other hand, to a better understanding of Collingwood's own view on the ontological argument.
His ontological argument is as familiar to academics as a footnote.