open classroom


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open classroom

n.
1. A system of elementary education in which instruction and activities are informally structured, flexible, and individualized.
2. A school or classroom in which this system is practiced.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Open classroom meetings allow students to solve class problems as a group, view a situation from other students' perspectives, and respectfully agree and disagree with one another.
For instance, in the recent past, many schools were designed with what was known as an open classroom concept.
Consider the scene from a 3rd-grade open classroom in a New York City elementary school described by two proponents, Walter and Miriam Schneir, in a 1971 New York Times Magazine article: What is most striking is that there are no desks for pupils or teachers.
(3.) An open classroom climate alone is not sufficient to develop positive political attitudes.
In the late 1960s and early 1970s, the concept of the "open classroom" was the education reform of the moment, though the evidence of its effectiveness was quite scant.
Durgin noted that Wales Elementary School is better for young children because it offers an open classroom, while the Holland Elementary School is better suited for educating the older children.
In the 1960s and early '70s, American educators flocked to Great Britain to observe innovative teaching, especially of young children, known as the open classroom. Of course, many teachers continued to use traditional methods, such as lecturing andrecitation, characteristic of schools everywhere.
It is also interesting to note that the movement to teach all children in the same place at the same time is a curious mishmash of ultraconservative thinking, which first opposed pull-out programs as being "elitist" and "un-American," and of ultraliberal thinking, which expressed itself during the 1970s in the form of the "open classroom" movement.
According to one current proponent of open education, critics have misunderstood the fundamental nature of the open classroom?
Learning centers became popular in the 1960s during the heyday of the "open classroom." They faded into oblivion when the deficiencies in the way they were used became obvious.
Implementing School Drama in an open classroom school setting