open shop

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open shop

n.
A place or policy of employment that does not permit discrimination against employees based on membership or nonmembership in a labor union.

open shop

n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) an establishment in which persons are hired and employed irrespective of their membership or nonmembership of a trade union. Compare closed shop, union shop

o′pen shop′


n.
a business establishment in which a union acts as representative of all the employees but in which union membership is not a condition of employment.
[1895–1900]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.open shop - a company whose workers are hired without regard to their membership in a labor union
company - an institution created to conduct business; "he only invests in large well-established companies"; "he started the company in his garage"
References in periodicals archive ?
The refusal of such unions to make reforms and be more economically competitive has been replicated throughout the city and has led to the rise of open-shop construction.
Synopsis: Historians have characterized the open-shop movement of the early twentieth century as a cynical attempt by business to undercut the labor movement by twisting the American ideals of independence and self-sufficiency to their own ends.
As an open-shop employee, in addition to being paid prevailing wages on all public jobs, I am also rewarded based on merit.
He added that the Newspaper Guild has signed open-shop contracts with newspapers in other cities and states.
An important and unfortunate consequence of the IUOE's sustained growth and bargaining power over that period was, however, excessive wage settlements and work rules that, the authors argue, contributed to sky-rocketing construction costs and eventually sowed the seeds for the subsequent open-shop incursion that would dominate the union's attention during the 1970s and 1980s.
Even the big contractors are switching over, with 45 percent of the top 400 construction companies now open-shop, up from just 8 percent in 1973.