openhandedness


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o·pen·hand·ed

 (ō′pən-hăn′dĭd)
adj.
1. Done with or having an open hand: an openhanded karate chop.
2. Giving freely; generous. See Synonyms at liberal.

o′pen·hand′ed·ly adv.
o′pen·hand′ed·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.openhandedness - liberality in bestowing giftsopenhandedness - liberality in bestowing gifts; extremely liberal and generous of spirit
liberality, liberalness - the trait of being generous in behavior and temperament

openhandedness

noun
References in classic literature ?
With the noble openhandedness of her class, she gave me sixpence; here it is, in proof that my words is true.
Description of Hospitality is: Friendliness, hospitableness, welcome, warm, reception, helpfulness, neighborliness, warmth, warmheartedness, kindness, kind-ability, generosity, liberality, bountifulness, openhandedness.
There's a magnanimous sense of kindness and openhandedness at work in Duncan's conclusion to the poem, and the sequence, that brings the many concepts and currents of influence, initiation, and instruction at work in "Poems from the Margins" to a fitting, yet unexpected, moment of the changing of the guard (73):
It also needed the openhandedness of Tru and others who protected the court by knowing how to slap down threats and manage affairs in the countryside.
Some Africans are wary of strings attached to China's apparent openhandedness. Zimbabwean Janet Munakamwe believes the Chinese will be saying "we have given Zimbabwe this amount of money, so you have to listen to whatever we are going to say.
Robinson repeatedly references the "openhandedness" of this passage in her most recent collection of essays When I Was a Child I Read Books (2012) in an attempt to realign American Christian thought to notions of a "liberal reward" for a socially progressive politics (Robinson 2012; 77, 68).
Studies have explored the impact of gender on the relationship between employment and women's well-being and reported that working women, generally, had more moderate attitudes than un-employed, while the high level of openhandedness in gender role attitudes remained to be linked with greater well-being among working women .
The parable of the rich fool (Luke 12:13-21) is "pretty obviously an ominous warning about the foolishness of covetousness or its twin, greed." (37) The opposite of covetousness and greed are generosity and openhandedness that can only come from people who seek to live closely with God.