opera


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op·er·a 1

 (ŏp′ər-ə, ŏp′rə)
n.
1. A theatrical presentation in which a dramatic performance is set to music.
2. The score of such a work.
3. A theater designed primarily for operas.

[Italian, work, opera, from Latin, work, service; see op- in Indo-European roots.]

o·pe·ra 2

 (ō′pər-ə, ŏp′ər-ə)
n.
A plural of opus.

opera

(ˈɒpərə; ˈɒprə)
n
1. (Classical Music) an extended dramatic work in which music constitutes a dominating feature, either consisting of separate recitatives, arias, and choruses, or having a continuous musical structure
2. (Classical Music) the branch of music or drama represented by such works
3. (Classical Music) the score, libretto, etc, of an opera
4. a theatre where opera is performed
[C17: via Italian from Latin: work, a work, plural of opus work]

opera

(ˈɒpərə)
n
a plural of opus

op•er•a1

(ˈɒp ər ə, ˈɒp rə)

n., pl. -er•as.
1. an extended dramatic work in which the parts are sung to orchestral accompaniment. Compare aria, comic opera, grand opera, recitative2.
2. the score of such a work.
3. an opera house or resident company.
[1635–45; < Italian: work, opera < Latin, orig. pl. of opus service, work, a work, opus]

o•pe•ra2

(ˈoʊ pər ə, ˈɒp ər ə)

n.
a pl. of opus.

opera

  • opera - Actually the Latin plural of opus, "labor, work."
  • prima donna - Meaning "principal female singer in an opera," it is from the same Italian phrase meaning "first lady"; the meaning "temperamental person" was first recorded in 1834.
  • primo vomo - The principal male singer in an opera.
  • soap opera - Goes back (1939) to the early days of radio suspense serials, which were mainly sponsored by soap-makers; the "opera" part is an echo of the earlier "horse opera"—a Western (1927).

opera

1. Drama set to music with the texts wholly or largely sung. Its seriousness or elevation of purpose and intention usually distinguishes it from other forms of musical theater with text.
2. Extended drama, its text sung, often with bravura solo and multiple voice passages.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.opera - a drama set to musicopera - a drama set to music; consists of singing with orchestral accompaniment and an orchestral overture and interludes
supertitle, surtitle - translation of the words of a foreign opera (or choral work) projected on a screen above the stage
act - a subdivision of a play or opera or ballet
classical, classical music, serious music - traditional genre of music conforming to an established form and appealing to critical interest and developed musical taste
bouffe, comic opera, opera bouffe, opera comique - opera with a happy ending and in which some of the text is spoken
grand opera - opera in which all the text is sung
musical drama - opera in which the musical and dramatic elements are equally important; the music is appropriate to the action
aria - an elaborate song for solo voice
2.Opera - a commercial browser
3.opera - a building where musical dramas are performedopera - a building where musical dramas are performed
theater, theatre, house - a building where theatrical performances or motion-picture shows can be presented; "the house was full"
Translations
أُوبِرَاأوبرا: رِوايَة غِنائِيَّه حِواريَّه
opera
opera
oopperaoopperatalo
opera
opera
ópera
オペラ
오페라
operaoperos teatrasteatriniai žiūronai
opera
opera
operaопера
opera
โอเปร่า
opera

opera

1 [ˈɒpərə]
A. Nópera f
B. CPD opera glasses NPLgemelos mpl de teatro
opera hat Nclac m
opera house Nteatro m de la ópera
opera singer Ncantante mf de ópera

opera

[ˈɒpərə]
nopéra m
a Wagner opera → un opéra de Wagner
I like opera and chamber music → J'aime l'opéra et la musique de chambre.
modif [director, critic] → d'opéra; [lover, star] → de l'opéra opera companyopera company ncompagnie f d'opéraopera glasses npljumelles fpl de théâtreopera house nopéra mopera singer nchanteur/euse m/f d'opéra

opera

nOper f; to go to the operain die Oper gehen

opera

in cpdsOpern-;
opera company
nOpernensemble nt
opera glasses
plOpernglas nt
opera hat
opera house
nOpernhaus nt

opera

[ˈɒprə] n (work) → opera (lirica); (genre) → opera, (musica) lirica

opera

(ˈopərə) noun
a musical drama in which the dialogue is sung. an opera by Verdi.
ˌopeˈratic (-ˈrӕ-) adjective
of, or relating to, opera. an operatic society; an operatic singer.
opera glasses
binoculars for use in a theatre.
ˈopera-house noun
a theatre in which operas are performed.

opera

أُوبِرَا opera opera Oper όπερα ópera ooppera opéra opera opera オペラ 오페라 opera opera opera ópera опера opera โอเปร่า opera opera 歌剧
References in classic literature ?
Though there was already talk of the erection, in remote metropolitan distances "above the Forties," of a new Opera House which should compete in costliness and splendour with those of the great European capitals, the world of fashion was still content to reassemble every winter in the shabby red and gold boxes of the sociable old Academy.
It was Madame Nilsson's first appearance that winter, and what the daily press had already learned to describe as "an exceptionally brilliant audience" had gathered to hear her, transported through the slippery, snowy streets in private broughams, in the spacious family landau, or in the humbler but more convenient "Brown coupe" To come to the Opera in a Brown coupe was almost as honourable a way of arriving as in one's own carriage; and departure by the same means had the immense advantage of enabling one
A pretty air in an opera is prettier there than it could be anywhere else, I suppose, just as an honest man in politics shines more than he would elsewhere.
I have since found out that there is nothing the Germans like so much as an opera.
On his return home, Albert expressed his wish to Franz Debray, and Morrel, to see them at the opera that evening.
Both got into Albert's coupe; and, as the young man had no reason to conceal where he was going, he called aloud, "To the opera.
Debienne and Poligny, the managers of the Opera, were giving a last gala performance to mark their retirement.
In music she thought him unreasonable, and in the matter of opera not only unreasonable but wilfully perverse.
far from willingly) I went the way of the world--in other words, I went to the opera.
He came out again with an opera-glass in his hand, walked a few paces on, and stopped to look at a bill of the opera placed outside a music- seller's shop.
Excuse me," he added, taking an opera glass out of her hand, and proceeding to scrutinize, over her bare shoulder, the row of boxes facing them.
I 'll go to the opera," she suddenly announced to the doves.