opera-goer

Related to opera-goer: donnot

opera-goer

n
someone who attends operas
Translations

opera-goer

[ˈɒpərəˌgəʊəʳ] Naficionado/a m/f a la ópera
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References in periodicals archive ?
When he greeted his readership in the first issue in February 1950, the Earl of Harewood knew exactly for whom he was writing: 'the intelligent opera-goer'.
AS A first time opera-goer, I felt a pang of fish-out-of-water syndrome as I approached the Theatre Royal to review this production.
The former hellraiser, who learned to play the piano following his decision to give up booze, has become an opera-goer.
A fellow opera-goer said: "They seemed very at ease with each other and were whispering during the performance.
Lady Mary Coke's letters offer a most unusual insight into the listening habits of a conventional opera-goer. A daughter of the Duke of Argyll and Greenwich, a divorcee who never remarried, she shared a box with the opera connoisseur Horace Walpole for many seasons between the 1760s and 1790s.(31) She wrote to her sister several times a week during this time, using a kind of shorthand typical of letters to an accustomed recipient, avoiding details that would lengthen the text excessively.
As no music is known to have survived from the Sporck operatic repertory, the most important documentation is a collection of librettos assembled by the keen opera-goer Count Vrtby.
The opera-goer who gets a reduced-price ticket because of a subsidy is also a taxpayer who pays for that subsidy.
However, the set provided the opportunity for the effective use of silhouetting in several scenes while the use of English surtitles was unobtrusive for the opera buff but helpful for the novice opera-goer.
The appendixes, in common with other volumes in the series, include a "Calendar," "List of Works," "Personalia," and "Select Bibliography." Burrows also provides a chart of "The Ruling Houses of Hanover, Britain and Prussia" and a translation of Pierre-Jacques Fongeroux's comments on the works he heard as "A London Opera-Goer in 1728." The book is admirably indexed and, although it is not meant as a reference work, is surprisingly effective in that guise.
To the first-time opera-goer, Madam Butterfly is a great starting place and The Sunderland Empire the perfect venue to understand the popularity of popular opera.
(EO's season slogan is "Shaken, not stirred.") Ainsworth is a dashing fellow, with a voice that can, I'm sure, induce romantic fantasies in many an opera-goer. If you are going to bringjames Bond into a Mozart frolic, he's your agent.