opprobrious

(redirected from opprobriously)
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op·pro·bri·ous

 (ə-prō′brē-əs)
adj.
1. Expressing contemptuous reproach; scornful or abusive: opprobrious epithets.
2. Bringing disgrace; shameful or infamous: opprobrious conduct.

op·pro′bri·ous·ly adv.

opprobrious

(əˈprəʊbrɪəs)
adj
1. expressing scorn, disgrace, or contempt
2. shameful or infamous
opˈprobriously adv
opˈprobriousness n

op•pro•bri•ous

(əˈproʊ bri əs)

adj.
1. conveying or expressing opprobrium, as language or a speaker.
2. disgraceful or shameful.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin]
op•pro′bri•ous•ly, adv.
op•pro′bri•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.opprobrious - expressing offensive reproachopprobrious - expressing offensive reproach  
offensive - causing anger or annoyance; "offensive remarks"
2.opprobrious - (used of conduct or character) deserving or bringing disgrace or shameopprobrious - (used of conduct or character) deserving or bringing disgrace or shame; "Man...has written one of his blackest records as a destroyer on the oceanic islands"- Rachel Carson; "an ignominious retreat"; "inglorious defeat"; "an opprobrious monument to human greed"; "a shameful display of cowardice"
dishonorable, dishonourable - lacking honor or integrity; deserving dishonor; "dishonorable in thought and deed"

opprobrious

adjective
1. Of, relating to, or characterized by verbal abuse:
2. Meriting or causing shame or dishonor:
Translations

opprobrious

[əˈprəʊbrɪəs] ADJ (frm) → oprobioso

opprobrious

adj invective, remarkverächtlich, schmähend; conductschändlich, schandhaft, schimpflich
References in classic literature ?
For my part I was by no means certain that this GABELOU (as our men alluded to her opprobriously) was after us at all.
The circumambient ambience that has necessitated the threatened taking over of the legislative functions of the Edo State House of Assembly by the National Assembly is not only maniacally bewildering, it's also opprobriously embarrassing.
In the 15th century this lexical item was 'applied opprobriously to a woman (12); strictly, a lewd or sensual woman; in modern use, especially 'a malicious or treacherous woman' (e.g., ?a1400 "Whom calleste thou queine, skabde biche?") (see also Mills 1989: 27; Partridge 2002: 84; Palmatier 1995: 30).