opprobrium

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op·pro·bri·um

 (ə-prō′brē-əm)
n.
1. Disgrace arising from exceedingly shameful conduct; ignominy.
2. Scornful reproach or contempt: a term of opprobrium.
3. Archaic A cause of shame or disgrace.

[Latin, from opprobrāre, to reproach : ob-, against; see ob- + probrum, reproach; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

opprobrium

(əˈprəʊbrɪəm)
n
1. the state of being abused or scornfully criticized
2. reproach or censure
3. a cause of disgrace or ignominy
[C17: from Latin ob- against + probrum a shameful act]

op•pro•bri•um

(əˈproʊ bri əm)

n.
1. the disgrace or reproach incurred by shameful conduct.
2. the cause of such disgrace or reproach.
3. reproach; scorn.
[1650–60; < Latin: reproach]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.opprobrium - state of disgrace resulting from public abuse
disgrace, ignominy, shame - a state of dishonor; "one mistake brought shame to all his family"; "suffered the ignominy of being sent to prison"
2.opprobrium - a state of extreme dishonor; "a date which will live in infamy"- F.D.Roosevelt; "the name was a by-word of scorn and opprobrium throughout the city"
dishonor, dishonour - a state of shame or disgrace; "he was resigned to a life of dishonor"

opprobrium

noun (Formal)
1. censure, criticism, condemnation, discredit, disapproval, reproach, stricture, calumny, odium, sideswipe, disfavour, stick (slang), obloquy, contumely, scurrility His political opinions have attracted public opprobrium.
2. disgrace, scandal, shame, stigma, stain, slur, degradation, disrepute, ignominy, dishonour, infamy, ill repute He had to undergo the opprobrium of a public trial.

opprobrium

noun
Translations

opprobrium

[əˈprəʊbrɪəm] N (frm) → oprobio m

opprobrium

[əˈprəʊbriəm] nopprobre m

opprobrium

n (= disgrace)Schande f, → Schmach f; (= scorn, reproach)Schmähung f; a term of opprobriumein Schmähwort nt

opprobrium

[əˈprəʊbrɪəm] n (frm) → vituperio
References in classic literature ?
Multitudes of drivers might howl in his rear, and passengers might load him with opprobrium, he would not awaken until some blue policeman turned red and began to frenziedly tear bridles and beat the soft noses of the responsible horses.
If an ill appointment should be made, the Executive for nominating, and the Senate for approving, would participate, though in different degrees, in the opprobrium and disgrace.
Let me add that it is the great desideratum by which this form of government can be rescued from the opprobrium under which it has so long labored, and be recommended to the esteem and adoption of mankind.