optical tweezers


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

optical tweezers

pl.n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
A technique that uses a single-beam laser directed through an objective lens to trap, image, and manipulate micron-sized particles in three dimensions.
References in periodicals archive ?
M2 PRESSWIRE-September 3, 2019-: Global Optical Tweezers (Mechanobiology) Market Driving Factors, and Forecast Analysis 2018-2028 | Radiant Insights, Inc.
Optical tweezers, a technology that has recently been recognised with the 2018 Nobel Prize, enable direct observation of the folding defects in single proteins.
Equinox is also suited to pumping dye lasers, frequency doubling and mixing, optical tweezers and trapping, and biomedical imaging.
Contract notice: Supply and installation of a dual system of optical tweezers combined cor relatively with con focal fluorescence microscopy and laminar micro fluidic technology
Using optical tweezers through highly focused laser beams, the team trapped and pushed together two protein droplets floating in a liquid buffer solution.
"Optical tweezers -- using lasers to probe cells -- is a popular approach," says Xian Wang, the PhD candidate who conducted the research.
According to the team the technique, described as a set of 'optical tweezers', represented a potential new tool to analyse biological samples or create devices using nano-assembly
Optical tweezers have found groundbreaking applications in biology and medicine, and the first half of this year's Nobel Prize in Physics recognises this advance.
The 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics was recently awarded to three physicists, Arthur Ashkin, Gerard Morou, and Donna Strickland, for their work with lasers to create optical tweezers and ultra-short, high-intensity laser pulses.
Arthur Ashkin from Bell Laboratories, USA, was lauded for his invention of optical tweezers that grab particles, atoms, viruses and other living cells with their laser beam fingers.
Ashkin was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for creating optical tweezers which can hold particles, atoms, viruses and other living cells with laser beam fingers.
Arthur Ashkin, the American who developed "optical tweezers," became the oldest Nobel Prize laureate at age 96.
Full browser ?