orang-outang


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Related to orang-outang: orangutan
Translations

orang-outang

, orang-utan
nOrang-Utan m
References in classic literature ?
THE orang-outang in the big iron cage lashed to the sheep-pen began the discussion.
The orang-outang's arm slid out negligently from between the bars.
The orang-outang, troubled by some dream of the forests of his freedom, began to yell like a soul in purgatory, and to wrench madly at the bars of the cage.
The orang-outang was quaking in an ecstasy of pure terror.
"Und dot man, who was king of beasts-tamer men, he had in der house shush such anoder as dot devil-animal in der cage-a great orang-outang dot thought he was a man.
His master had taught him, as he might an orang-outang, to rub the floors, dust the furniture, black his boots, brush his coats, and bring a lantern to guide him home at night if the weather were cloudy, and clogs if it rained.
When you can look round a roomful of people and think that each one is a mere child in intellect compared with yourself you feel no more shy of them than you would of a select company of magpies or orang-outangs.
Thus, Edward Tyson, the first European to dissect a chimpanzee, called his subject an 'orang-outang'; and although the authors do not mention it, 'gorilla' derives from an alleged African word meaning 'wild or hairy man' (Shorter Oxford English Dictionary) just as Malay 'orang hutan', 'forest or wild man', has evolved into the vernacular English name for the orangutan.
Most useful to directors, actors and students of theatre will perhaps be the generous illustrations, some of them familiar, such as Vecellio's image of a Moor (179), Theodore de Bry's illustrations of Virginia (174-7), or Geoffrey Whirney's emblem "to wash an Ethiope" (120), but more of them unfamiliar, such as the salacious engraving of a Brahmin widow jumping or falling on to her husband's funeral pyre (182), Edward Tyson's comparative anatomies of a "man," a "pygmy...a particular species of ape" and a "wild man, orang-outang, or man of the woods" (274-5), or George Sandys' "Turkish damsel" wearing what look to me like pattens (194).
A keeper wrestles with a colleague dressed as a giant orang-outang as it tries to escape from a zoo.