orator


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Related to orator: oratory

or·a·tor

 (ôr′ə-tər, ŏr′-)
n.
1. One who delivers an oration.
2. An eloquent and skilled public speaker.

or′a·tor·ship′ n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

orator

(ˈɒrətə)
n
1. a public speaker, esp one versed in rhetoric
2. a person given to lengthy or pompous speeches
3. (Law) obsolete the claimant in a cause of action in chancery
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

or•a•tor

(ˈɔr ə tər, ˈɒr-)

n.
a person who delivers an oration; a public speaker, esp. one of great eloquence.
[1325–75; Middle English oratour < Latin ōrātor speaker, suppliant, derivative of ōrāre; see oration]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.orator - a person who delivers a speech or orationorator - a person who delivers a speech or oration
eulogist, panegyrist - an orator who delivers eulogies or panegyrics
elocutionist - a public speaker trained in voice production and gesture and delivery
haranguer - a public speaker who delivers a loud or forceful or angry speech
speaker, talker, verbaliser, verbalizer, utterer - someone who expresses in language; someone who talks (especially someone who delivers a public speech or someone especially garrulous); "the speaker at commencement"; "an utterer of useful maxims"
spellbinder - an orator who can hold his listeners spellbound
tub-thumper - a noisy and vigorous or ranting public speaker
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

orator

noun public speaker, speaker, lecturer, spokesperson, declaimer, rhetorician, Cicero, spieler (informal), word-spinner, spokesman or spokeswoman Lenin was the greatest orator of the Russian revolution.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

orator

noun
A public speaker:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
خَطيب، رَجُل فَصيح
řečník
taler
orator
szónok
ræîumaîur
orator
rečník

orator

[ˈɒrətəʳ] Norador(a) m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

orator

[ˈɒrətər] norateur/trice m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

orator

nRedner(in) m(f), → Orator m (rare, Hist)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

orator

[ˈɒrətəʳ] noratore/trice
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

oration

(əˈreiʃən) noun
a formal, public speech, especially in fine, beautiful language. a funeral oration.
orator (ˈorətə) noun
a person who makes public speeches, especially very eloquent ones.
ˈoratory (ˈorə-) noun
the art of speaking well in public.
oraˈtorical adjective
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
AN Orator afflicted with atrophy of the organ of common-sense rose in his place in the halls of legislation and pointed with pride to his Unblotted Escutcheon.
I am neither an orator nor a man of science, and I had no idea of addressing you in public; but my friend Barbicane has told me that you would like to hear me, and I am quite at your service.
That office consists in mincing the horse-pieces of blubber for the pots; an operation which is conducted at a curious wooden horse, planted endwise against the bulwarks, and with a capacious tub beneath it, into which the minced pieces drop, fast as the sheets from a rapt orator's desk.
Question was asked of Demosthenes, what was the chief part of an orator? he answered, action; what next?
'Good!' 'Hear, hear, hear!' 'Hurrah!' and other cries, arose in many voices from various parts of the densely crowded and suffocatingly close Hall, in which the orator, perched on a stage, delivered himself of this and what other froth and fume he had in him.
"I didn't say felons!" the Chancellor explained.) "You may be sure that I always sympa--"("'Ear, 'ear!" shouted the crowd, so loudly as quite to drown the orator's thin squeaky voice) "--that I always sympa--" he repeated.("Don't simper quite so much!" said the man under the window.
The nobility don't gwudge theah lives- evewy one of us will go and bwing in more wecwuits, and the sov'weign" (that was the way he referred to the Emperor) "need only say the word and we'll all die fo' him!" added the orator with animation.
However much we may admire the orator's occasional bursts of eloquence, the noblest written words are commonly as far behind or above the fleeting spoken language as the firmament with its stars is behind the clouds.
All this time the eyes of the thousands present looked straight at the Negro orator. A strange thing was to happen.
The last great prose-writer of the eighteenth century, Edmund Burke, is also the greatest of English orators. Burke is the only writer primarily a statesman and orator who can be properly ranked among English authors of the first class.
The warriors in front stepped aside, opening the way to their most approved orator by the action; one who spoke all those languages that were cultivated among the northern aborigines.
He kept his eyes fixed on the orator, who sat in an armchair, his head leaning on his hand and his attitude indicating exhaustion.