ordain

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or·dain

 (ôr-dān′)
tr.v. or·dained, or·dain·ing, or·dains
1.
a. To invest with ministerial or priestly authority; confer holy orders on: ordain a priest.
b. To authorize as a rabbi.
2. To order or decree by virtue of superior authority: The management ordained that business attire should be worn in the office at all times.
3. To prearrange unalterably; predestine: events that were ordained by fate.

[Middle English ordeinen, from Old French ordener, ordein-, from Latin ōrdināre, to organize, appoint to office, from ōrdō, ōrdin-, order; see ar- in Indo-European roots.]

or·dain′er n.
or·dain′ment n.

ordain

(ɔːˈdeɪn)
vb (tr)
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) to consecrate (someone) as a priest; confer holy orders upon
2. (may take a clause as object) to decree, appoint, or predestine irrevocably
3. (may take a clause as object) to order, establish, or enact with authority
4. obsolete to select for an office
[C13: from Anglo-Norman ordeiner, from Late Latin ordināre, from Latin ordo order]
orˈdainer n
orˈdainment n

or•dain

(ɔrˈdeɪn)
v.t.
1. to invest with ministerial or sacerdotal functions; confer holy orders upon.
2. to enact or establish by law, edict, etc.
3. to decree; give orders for.
4. (of God, fate, etc.) to destine or predestine.
5. Archaic. to select for or appoint to an office.
v.i.
6. to order or command.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French ordener < Latin ordināre to order, arrange, appoint. See ordination]
or•dain′a•ble, adj.
or•dain′er, n.

ordain


Past participle: ordained
Gerund: ordaining

Imperative
ordain
ordain
Present
I ordain
you ordain
he/she/it ordains
we ordain
you ordain
they ordain
Preterite
I ordained
you ordained
he/she/it ordained
we ordained
you ordained
they ordained
Present Continuous
I am ordaining
you are ordaining
he/she/it is ordaining
we are ordaining
you are ordaining
they are ordaining
Present Perfect
I have ordained
you have ordained
he/she/it has ordained
we have ordained
you have ordained
they have ordained
Past Continuous
I was ordaining
you were ordaining
he/she/it was ordaining
we were ordaining
you were ordaining
they were ordaining
Past Perfect
I had ordained
you had ordained
he/she/it had ordained
we had ordained
you had ordained
they had ordained
Future
I will ordain
you will ordain
he/she/it will ordain
we will ordain
you will ordain
they will ordain
Future Perfect
I will have ordained
you will have ordained
he/she/it will have ordained
we will have ordained
you will have ordained
they will have ordained
Future Continuous
I will be ordaining
you will be ordaining
he/she/it will be ordaining
we will be ordaining
you will be ordaining
they will be ordaining
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been ordaining
you have been ordaining
he/she/it has been ordaining
we have been ordaining
you have been ordaining
they have been ordaining
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been ordaining
you will have been ordaining
he/she/it will have been ordaining
we will have been ordaining
you will have been ordaining
they will have been ordaining
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been ordaining
you had been ordaining
he/she/it had been ordaining
we had been ordaining
you had been ordaining
they had been ordaining
Conditional
I would ordain
you would ordain
he/she/it would ordain
we would ordain
you would ordain
they would ordain
Past Conditional
I would have ordained
you would have ordained
he/she/it would have ordained
we would have ordained
you would have ordained
they would have ordained
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.ordain - order by virtue of superior authority; decree; "The King ordained the persecution and expulsion of the Jews"; "the legislature enacted this law in 1985"
decree - issue a decree; "The King only can decree"
reenact - enact again; "Congress reenacted the law"
legislate, pass - make laws, bills, etc. or bring into effect by legislation; "They passed the amendment"; "We cannot legislate how people spend their free time"
2.ordain - appoint to a clerical posts; "he was ordained in the Church"
enthrone, vest, invest - provide with power and authority; "They vested the council with special rights"
3.ordain - invest with ministerial or priestly authority; "The minister was ordained only last month"
enthrone, vest, invest - provide with power and authority; "They vested the council with special rights"
4.ordain - issue an order
predestine - decree or determine beforehand
will - decree or ordain; "God wills our existence"
destine, doom, fate, designate - decree or designate beforehand; "She was destined to become a great pianist"
decree - issue a decree; "The King only can decree"

ordain

verb
1. appoint, call, name, commission, select, elect, invest, install, nominate, anoint, consecrate, frock Her brother was ordained as a priest in 1982.
2. (Formal) order, will, rule, demand, require, direct, establish, command, dictate, prescribe, pronounce, lay down, decree, instruct, enact, legislate, enjoin He ordained that women should be veiled in public.
3. predestine, fate, intend, mark out, predetermine, foreordain, destine, preordain His future seemed ordained right from the start.

ordain

verb
To set forth expressly and authoritatively:
Translations
يَرْسُم الشَّخْصَ كاهِنا
ordinere
vígja
ordinēt, iesvētīt
papaz yapmak

ordain

[ɔːˈdeɪn]
A. VT
1. (= order) → ordenar, decretar; [God] → mandar, disponer
it was ordained thatse dispuso que ...
2. (Rel) → ordenar
to ordain sb priestordenar a algn sacerdote
to be ordainedordenarse
B. VImandar, disponer
as God ordainssegún manda Dios, como Dios manda

ordain

[ɔːrˈdeɪn] vt
[+ priest] → ordonner
to be ordained → être ordonné prêtre
(= decree) → décréter
to ordain that ... → décréter que ...

ordain

vt
sbordinieren; (Eccl) a priestweihen; to be ordained priest/to the ministryordiniert werden; (Catholic also) → zum Priester geweiht werden
(= destine: God, fate) → wollen, bestimmen; God has ordained that man should dieGott hat es gewollt or hat bestimmt, dass der Mensch sterbe; fate ordained that he should die, it was ordained that he should diedas Schicksal hat es so gefügt or es war ihm vom Schicksal bestimmt, dass er sterben sollte
(= decree) (law) → bestimmen; (ruler) → verfügen

ordain

[ɔːˈdeɪn] vt
a. (decree) → decretare
it was ordained that ... (fig) → era destino che...
b. (Rel) → ordinare

ordain

(oːˈdein) verb
to make (someone) a priest, minister etc, usually by a church ceremony. He was ordained a priest.
References in classic literature ?
But I agree, he replied; for I suppose that you mean to exclude mere uninstructed courage, such as that of a wild beast or of a slave-- this, in your opinion, is not the courage which the law ordains, and ought to have another name.
If we are asked to determine which of these four qualities by its presence contributes most to the excellence of the State, whether the agreement of rulers and subjects, or the preservation in the soldiers of the opinion which the law ordains about the true nature of dangers, or wisdom and watchfulness in the rulers, or whether this other which I am mentioning, and which is found in children and women, slave and freeman, artisan, ruler, subject,--the quality, I mean, of every one doing his own work, and not being a busybody, would claim the palm--the question is not so easily answered.
The only thing in the proposed Constitution, which wears the appearance of confining the causes of federal cognizance to the federal courts, is contained in this passage: "THE JUDICIAL POWER of the United States shall be vested in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior courts as the Congress shall from time to time ordain and establish.
2] It declares, in the next place, that "the JUDICIAL POWER of the United States shall be vested in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior courts as Congress shall ordain and establish"; and it then proceeds to enumerate the cases to which this judicial power shall extend.
But the bishop would not ordain him--why is not known, but it was said that he was offended with Goldsmith for coming to be ordained dressed in scarlet breeches.
By ancient tradition the Church ordains deacons and priests on a date as close as possible to the feast day of St Peter on June 29th.