order of magnitude


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order of magnitude

n. pl. orders of magnitude
1. An estimate of size or magnitude expressed as a power of ten: Earth's mass is of the order of magnitude of 1022 tons; that of the sun is 1027 tons.
2. A range of values between a designated lower value and an upper value ten times as large: The masses of Earth and the sun differ by five orders of magnitude.

order of magnitude

n
(Statistics) the approximate size of something, esp measured in powers of 10: the order of magnitude of the deficit was as expected; their estimates differ by an order of magnitude. Also called: order
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.order of magnitude - a degree in a continuum of size or quantity; "it was on the order of a mile"; "an explosion of a low order of magnitude"
magnitude - the property of relative size or extent (whether large or small); "they tried to predict the magnitude of the explosion"; "about the magnitude of a small pea"
2.order of magnitude - a number assigned to the ratio of two quantitiesorder of magnitude - a number assigned to the ratio of two quantities; two quantities are of the same order of magnitude if one is less than 10 times as large as the other; the number of magnitudes that the quantities differ is specified to within a power of 10
ratio - the relative magnitudes of two quantities (usually expressed as a quotient)
Translations
suuruusluokka
References in periodicals archive ?
As the DoD transforms, the expectations and opportunities for acquisition professionals will increase by order of magnitude. To prepare for advancement to levels of greater responsibility and authority, acquisition professionals should demonstrate exceptional analytical and decision-making capabilities, job performance, and gain qualifying experience.
Nonetheless, taken together, the numerical results reported here may overstate the actual number of anthrax cases by at least 1 order of magnitude, and perhaps many.
The latter expression translates into 1/14,000 of a percent or 0.000000714--less than one part per million, or 714 nanograms per gram, an order of magnitude less that the figure expressed in numbers.
Computer simulations show significantly greater resistance to hydrodynamic instabilities in the new designs, allowing almost an order of magnitude relaxation on specifications for surface roughness over previous designs.
Buffers between the pit and nearby residences are "an order of magnitude" greater than needs to be under MOE guidelines.
Combining forces with Kagan was a natural extension of our research arm and increases our research capabilities by an order of magnitude."
The basic concept is to use techniques from the world of biotechnology to develop proteins or carbohydrates that specifically bond to the surfaces of the selected building blocks in a way that provides at least an order of magnitude increase in strength.
Already providing a useful material for a number of applications, further optimization of the process may result in a technology that is capable of fulfilling the recycling role using mixing energies, which are of the same order of magnitude as established mixing technologies already in the industry.
Our habitat is being restructured on an order of magnitude beyond ken.
Lerner's proposals are more detailed than Ruskin's -- perhaps they need to be, given that twentieth-century threats raised nineteenth-century threats to another order of magnitude; he outlines a sweeping reconfiguration of medicine, law, education, and working life.
(Note also within each order of magnitude the remarkable, nonlinear convention of representing smaller increments.
Today, the Internet is driving change on the same order of magnitude as the Industrial Revolution.

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