orders


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or·der

 (ôr′dər)
n.
1. A condition of logical or comprehensible arrangement among the separate elements of a group.
2.
a. A condition of methodical or prescribed arrangement among component parts such that proper functioning or appearance is achieved: checked to see that the shipping department was in order.
b. Condition or state in general: The escalator is in good working order.
3.
a. The established system of social organization: "Every revolution exaggerates the evils of the old order" (C. Wright Mills).
b. A condition in which freedom from disorder or disruption is maintained through respect for established authority: finally restored order in the rebellious provinces.
4. A sequence or arrangement of successive things: changed the order of the files.
5. The prescribed form or customary procedure, as in a meeting or court of law: The bailiff called the court to order.
6. An authoritative indication to be obeyed; a command or direction.
7.
a. A command given by a superior military officer requiring obedience, as in the execution of a task.
b. orders Formal written instructions to report for military duty at a specified time and place.
8.
a. A commission or instruction to buy, sell, or supply something.
b. That which is supplied, bought, or sold.
9.
a. A request made by a customer at a restaurant for a portion of food.
b. The food requested.
10. Law A directive or command of a court.
11. Ecclesiastical
a. Any of several grades of the Christian ministry: the order of priesthood.
b. often orders The rank of an ordained Christian minister or priest.
c. often orders The sacrament or rite of ordination.
12. Any of the nine grades or choirs of angels.
13. A group of persons living under a religious rule: Order of Saint Benedict.
14. An organization of people united by a common fraternal bond or social aim.
15.
a. A group of people upon whom a government or sovereign has formally conferred honor for unusual service or merit, entitling them to wear a special insignia: the Order of the Garter.
b. The insignia worn by such people.
16. often orders A social class: the lower orders.
17. A class defined by the common attributes of its members; a kind.
18. Degree of quality or importance; rank: poetry of a high order.
19. Architecture
a. Any of several styles of classical architecture characterized by the type of column and entablature employed. Of the five generally accepted classical orders, the Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian orders are Greek and the Tuscan and Composite orders are Roman.
b. A style of building: a cathedral of the Gothic order.
20. Biology A taxonomic category of organisms ranking above a family and below a class.
21. Mathematics
a. The sum of the exponents to which the variables in a term are raised; degree.
b. An indicated number of successive differentiations to be performed.
c. The number of elements in a finite group.
d. The number of rows or columns in a determinant or matrix.
v. or·dered, or·der·ing, or·ders
v.tr.
1.
a. To issue a command or instruction to: ordered the sailors to stow their gear.
b. To direct to proceed as specified: ordered the intruders off the property.
2.
a. To give a command or instruction for: The judge ordered a recount of the ballots.
b. To request to be supplied with: order eggs and bacon for breakfast.
3. To put into a methodical, systematic arrangement: ordered the books on the shelf. See Synonyms at arrange.
4. To predestine; ordain.
v.intr.
To give an order or orders; request that something be done or supplied.
Idioms:
in order that
So that.
in order to
For the purpose of.
in short order
With no delay; quickly.
on order
Requested but not yet delivered.
on the order of
1. Of a kind or fashion similar to; like: a house on the order of a mountain lodge.
2. Approximately; about: equipment costing on the order of a million dollars.
to order
According to the buyer's specifications.

[Middle English ordre, from Old French, variant of ordene, from Latin ōrdō, ōrdin-; see ar- in Indo-European roots.]

or′der·er n.

orders

(ˈɔːdəz)
pl n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) short for holy orders
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) in holy orders in orders ordained
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) take holy orders take orders to become ordained
4. (Roman Catholic Church) short for major orders, minor orders
Translations
References in classic literature ?
And if a superior officer gives you orders, you will obey?
Then we return to the prisoner the valuables he wore at the time of his imprisonment, his clothes and papers, if the minister's orders have not otherwise dictated.
There seem to be various orders of truth in this world.
General, I must obey orders, but I am not bound to endure.
I have received from his Excellency Governor Lawrence, the King's Commission, which I have in my hand; and by his orders you are convened together to manifest to you, his Majesty's final resolution to the French inhabitants of this his Province of Nova-Scotia; who, for almost half a century, have had more indulgence granted them than any of his subjects in any part of his dominions; what use you have made of it you yourselves best know.
I know that orders have been given to the hired murderers of the society for my assassination.
I received orders to go and take charge of you on the sea, and to conduct you to this castle.
At last the admiral, with studied delay, gave the last orders for the departure of the boats.
I know it well,'' said Nathan; ``but wottest thou that Lucas de Beaumanoir, the chief of their Order, and whom they term Grand Master, is now himself at Templestowe?
Finally the gorgeous jewel of the order, gleaming upon the breast of every member, suggested "your Badgesty," which was adopted, and the order became popularly known as the Kings of Catarrh.
Now this is not of much consequence where the corruption of society, and pretension to be what you are not, is confined to cobblers; but when the guardians of the laws and of the government are only seemingly and not real guardians, then see how they turn the State upside down; and on the other hand they alone have the power of giving order and happiness to the State.
With this before me by way of example, I was persuaded that it would indeed be preposterous for a private individual to think of reforming a state by fundamentally changing it throughout, and overturning it in order to set it up amended; and the same I thought was true of any similar project for reforming the body of the sciences, or the order of teaching them established in the schools: but as for the opinions which up to that time I had embraced, I thought that I could not do better than resolve at once to sweep them wholly away, that I might afterwards be in a position to admit either others more correct, or even perhaps the same when they had undergone the scrutiny of reason.