organic


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or·gan·ic

 (ôr-găn′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or derived from living organisms: organic matter.
2. Of, relating to, or affecting a bodily organ: an organic disease.
3.
a. Of, marked by, or involving the use of fertilizers or pesticides that are strictly of animal or vegetable origin: organic vegetables; an organic farm.
b. Raised or conducted without the use of drugs, hormones, or synthetic chemicals: organic chicken; organic cattle farming.
c. Serving organic food: an organic restaurant.
d. Simple, healthful, and close to nature: an organic lifestyle.
4.
a. Having properties associated with living organisms.
b. Resembling a living organism in organization or development; interconnected: society as an organic whole.
5. Constituting an integral part of a whole; fundamental.
6. Law Denoting or relating to the fundamental or constitutional laws and precepts of a government or an organization.
7. Chemistry Of or designating carbon compounds.
n.
1. An organic food or a product made from organic materials.
2. A substance, especially a fertilizer or pesticide, of animal or vegetable origin.
3. Chemistry An organic compound.

or·gan′i·cal·ly adv.
or′gan·ic′i·ty (ôr′gə-nĭs′ĭ-tē) n.

organic

(ɔːˈɡænɪk)
adj
1. (Biology) of, relating to, derived from, or characteristic of living plants and animals
2. (Biology) of or relating to animal or plant constituents or products having a carbon basis
3. (Biology) of or relating to one or more organs of an animal or plant
4. (Chemistry) of, relating to, or belonging to the class of chemical compounds that are formed from carbon: an organic compound. Compare inorganic2
5. constitutional in the structure of something; fundamental; integral
6. of or characterized by the coordination of integral parts; organized
7. developing naturally: organic change through positive education.
8. (Law) of or relating to the essential constitutional laws regulating the government of a state: organic law.
9. (Agriculture) of, relating to, or grown with the use of fertilizers or pesticides deriving from animal or vegetable matter, rather than from chemicals
n
10. (Agriculture) any substance, such as a fertilizer or pesticide, that is derived from animal or vegetable matter
11. organic food collectively
orˈganically adv

or•gan•ic

(ɔrˈgæn ɪk)

adj.
1. noting or pertaining to a class of chemical compounds that formerly comprised only those existing in or derived from plants or animals, but that now includes all other compounds of carbon. Compare inorganic (def. 3).
2. pertaining to, characteristic of, or derived from living organisms.
3. of, pertaining to, or involving animals, produce, etc., raised or grown without synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, or drugs: organic farming; organic chicken.
4. of or pertaining to an organ or the organs of an animal, plant, or fungus.
5. of, pertaining to, or affecting living tissue.
6. caused by physical change or impairment: organic disorder. Compare functional (def. 5).
7. characterized by the systematic arrangement of parts; organized; systematic.
8. of or pertaining to the basic constitution or structure of a thing; constitutional; inherent; fundamental.
9. developing in the manner of living organisms: a view of history as organic.
10. Law. pertaining to the laws organizing the government of a state.
n.
11. a substance, as a fertilizer or pesticide, of animal or vegetable origin.
[1350–1400; < Latin organicus by or employing a mechanical device, instrumental < Greek organikós]
or•gan′i•cal•ly, adv.

or·gan·ic

(ôr-găn′ĭk)
1. Involving organisms or the products of their life processes.
2. Relating to chemical compounds containing carbon, especially hydrocarbons.
3. Using or produced with fertilizers or pesticides that are strictly of animal or vegetable origin.

organic

Assigned to and forming an essential part of a military organization. Organic parts of a unit are those listed in its table of organization for the Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps, and are assigned to the administrative organizations of the operating forces for the Navy.

organic

1. Relates to either living organisms, or compounds containing carbon (except carbonates, hydrogen carbonates and carbon dioxide).
2. (1) Chemical compounds containing carbon resulting from the decomposition of plants and animals. (2) Term applied to some composts and mulches derived from plants. (3) Method of growing plants without using man-made chemicals.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.organic - a fertilizer that is derived from animal or vegetable matterorganic - a fertilizer that is derived from animal or vegetable matter
bonemeal - fertilizer made of ground bones
neem cake - residue after oil is pressed from neem seeds
fertiliser, fertilizer, plant food - any substance such as manure or a mixture of nitrates used to make soil more fertile
manure - any animal or plant material used to fertilize land especially animal excreta usually with litter material
fish meal - ground dried fish used as fertilizer and as feed for domestic livestock
guano - the excrement of sea birds; used as fertilizer
Adj.1.organic - relating or belonging to the class of chemical compounds having a carbon basis; "hydrocarbons are organic compounds"
chemical science, chemistry - the science of matter; the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions
inorganic - relating or belonging to the class of compounds not having a carbon basis; "hydrochloric and sulfuric acids are called inorganic substances"
2.organic - being or relating to or derived from or having properties characteristic of living organisms; "organic life"; "organic growth"; "organic remains found in rock"
inorganic - lacking the properties characteristic of living organisms
3.organic - involving or affecting physiology or bodily organs; "an organic disease"
pathology - the branch of medical science that studies the causes and nature and effects of diseases
functional - involving or affecting function rather than physiology; "functional deafness"
4.organic - of or relating to foodstuff grown or raised without synthetic fertilizers or pesticides or hormones; "organic eggs"; "organic vegetables"; "organic chicken"
health food - any natural or prepared food popularly believed to promote good health
wholesome - conducive to or characteristic of physical or moral well-being; "wholesome attitude"; "wholesome appearance"; "wholesome food"
5.organic - simple and healthful and close to nature; "an organic lifestyle"
healthful - conducive to good health of body or mind; "a healthful climate"; "a healthful environment"; "healthful nutrition"; "healthful sleep"; "Dickens's relatively healthful exuberance"
6.organic - constitutional in the structure of something (especially your physical makeup)
essential - basic and fundamental; "the essential feature"

organic

adjective
1. pesticide-free, natural, chemical-free, additive-free Organic farming is expanding everywhere.
2. natural, biological, living, live, vital, animate, biotic Oxygen is vital to all organic life on Earth.
3. developing, growing, progressing, maturing, evolving, flourishing, blossoming to manage the company and supervise its organic growth
4. systematic, ordered, structured, organized, integrated, orderly, standardized, methodical, well-ordered, systematized City planning treats the city as an organic whole.
5. integral, fundamental, constitutional, structural, inherent, innate, immanent, hard-wired The history of Russia is an organic part of European history.

organic

adjective
Produced by nature; not artificial or manmade:
Translations
عُضْويعُضْوي، طَبيعي، بِدون أسْمِدَهعُضْوِيّ
organický
organisk
luomu-orgaaninen
organski
bio-szervesszervi
líffæra-lífrænn
有機体の
유기의
organický
organski
ekologiskorganisk
ซึ่งมาจากสิ่งมีชีวิต
organikorganlara aitcanlıdoğalhormonsuz
hữu cơ

organic

[ɔːˈgænɪk] ADJ
1. (= living) [matter, waste] → orgánico; [fertiliser] → orgánico, natural
2. (= not chemical) [farmer, farm, methods] → ecológico; [vegetables, produce] → de cultivo biológico, biológico; [meat] → ecológico; [flour] → integral; [wine, beer] → sin sustancias artificiales
organic foodalimentos mpl biológicos, alimentos mpl de cultivo biológico
organic farmingagricultura f ecológica or biológica
organic restaurantrestaurante m de cocina natural
3. (Chem) → orgánico
organic chemistryquímica f orgánica
4. (frm) (= natural) [growth, development, change] → natural; (= united) [society, state, community] → orgánico

organic

[ɔːrˈgænɪk] adj
[crops, farming] → biologique; [food] → bio f inv
organic fruit and vegetables → des fruits et légumes bio, des fruits et légumes bios
[material, remains] → organique
[growth] → organique

organic

adj
(Sci, Med) → organisch
vegetables, farmingbiodynamisch; organic wine/flourWein m/Mehl ntaus biologisch kontrolliertem Anbau; organic beer Bier aus Zutaten, die aus biologisch kontrolliertem Anbau stammen; organic meatFleisch ntaus biologisch kontrollierter Zucht; organic methods (Agr) → naturnahe Bewirtschaftung
(fig) whole, unityorganisch; part of wholesubstanziell, substantiell; faultimmanent

organic

:
organic chemistry
organic farm
nBio-Landwirtschaftsbetrieb m
organic farmer
nBio-Bauer m, → Bio-Bäuerin f
organic waste

organic

[ɔːˈgænɪk] adj
a. (gen, also) (fig) → organico/a
b. (free of chemicals, vegetables, food, farming) → biologico/a
organic restaurant → ristorante m macrobiotico

organ1

(ˈoːgən) noun
1. a part of the body or of a plant which has a special purpose. the reproductive organs.
2. a means of spreading information, eg a newspaper. an organ of the Communist Party.
orˈganic (-ˈgӕ-) adjective
1. of or concerning the organs of the body. organic diseases.
2. of, found in, or produced by, living things. Organic compounds all contain carbon.
3. (of food) grown without the use of artificial fertilizers.
orˈganically adverb

organic

عُضْوِيّ organický organisk biodynamisch οργανικός ecológico, orgánico luomu- bio organski organico 有機体の 유기의 biologisch organisk organiczny orgânico органический ekologisk ซึ่งมาจากสิ่งมีชีวิต organik hữu cơ 有机的

or·gan·ic

a. orgánico-a.
1. rel. a un órgano u órganos;
2. rel. a organismos de origen vegetal o animal;
___ diseaseenfermedad ___.

organic

adj orgánico; — food alimento orgánico (frec. pl)
References in classic literature ?
In considering the Origin of Species, it is quite conceivable that a naturalist, reflecting on the mutual affinities of organic beings, on their embryological relations, their geographical distribution, geological succession, and other such facts, might come to the conclusion that each species had not been independently created, but had descended, like varieties, from other species.
The author of the 'Vestiges of Creation' would, I presume, say that, after a certain unknown number of generations, some bird had given birth to a woodpecker, and some plant to the misseltoe, and that these had been produced perfect as we now see them; but this assumption seems to me to be no explanation, for it leaves the case of the coadaptations of organic beings to each other and to their physical conditions of life, untouched and unexplained.
In the next chapter the Struggle for Existence amongst all organic beings throughout the world, which inevitably follows from their high geometrical powers of increase, will be treated of.
In the next chapter I shall consider the geological succession of organic beings throughout time; in the eleventh and twelfth, their geographical distribution throughout space; in the thirteenth, their classification or mutual affinities, both when mature and in an embryonic condition.
For a thing whose presence or absence makes no visible difference, is not an organic part of the whole.
In nature every species of organic being instinctively adopts and practises those acts which most conduce to the prevalence or supremacy of its kind.
Although the productions of the land are thus scanty, if we look to the waters of the surrounding sea, the number of organic beings is indeed infinite.
It is excusable to grow enthusiastic over the infinite numbers of organic beings with which the sea of the tropics, so prodigal of life, teems; yet I must confess I think those naturalists who have described, in well-known words, the submarine grottoes decked with a thousand beauties, have indulged in rather exuberant language.
The organic forces separate the atoms of carbonate of lime, one by one, from the foaming breakers, and unite them into a symmetrical structure.
The recuperative power which pervaded organic nature was surely not denied to maidenhood alone.
It is evident then that in the due government of a family, greater attention should be paid to the several members of it and their virtues than to the possessions or riches of it; and greater to the freemen than the slaves: but here some one may doubt whether there is any other virtue in a slave than his organic services, and of higher estimation than these, as temperance, fortitude, justice, and such-like habits, or whether they possess only bodily qualities: each side of the question has its difficulties; for if they possess these virtues, wherein do they differ from freemen?
if John Barleycorn could get such sway over me, a non-alcoholic, what must be the sufferings of the true alcoholic, battling against the organic demands of his chemistry while those closest to him sympathise little, understand less, and despise and deride him!